More Info on Cord Blood Banking

TAMPA -

This is a Q&A for parents regarding Umbilical Cord Blood Banking from the American Academy of Pediatrics:

1. Does the hospital I'm delivering my baby at have a public cord blood banking program?

Ask the hospital you are having your baby at if it has a public cord blood banking program. Consider donating your infant's cord blood so that it can be used to treat a child or adult in need of a donor for a stem cell (bone marrow) transplantation. Understand that once you donate the cord blood to a public bank, you are unlikely to recover it even if it could be used for a family member.

2. What is sibling donor cord blood banking?

If you currently have a child who has a disease that could potentially benefit from a cord blood transplantation and you are having another child with the same father, be sure to consider banking the infant's cord blood for future transplantation.

Sibling banking can be done in a number of cord blood programs. Most do not charge for storage, but some charges may occur when the cord blood is released. The cord blood unit banked under these circumstances will be saved for you and your family and will not be made available to the public. You should ask what will happen with the cord blood if it does not HLA match with the sibling who has a potentially transplantable disease.

3. What are the recommended guidelinesgprocedures for related and unrelated cord blood banking?

prep wusf10.csv wusf_articles.csv wusf_articles_fixed.csv wusf_articles_tidle.csv wusf_content.csv wusf_fmteasers1.csv Cord blood should be collected in a bag containing citrate-phosphate-dextrose anticoagulant. prep wusf10.csv wusf_articles.csv wusf_articles_fixed.csv wusf_articles_tidle.csv wusf_content.csv wusf_fmteasers1.csv Cord blood should be processed and frozen within 48 hours of collection. prep wusf10.csv wusf_articles.csv wusf_articles_fixed.csv wusf_articles_tidle.csv wusf_content.csv wusf_fmteasers1.csv Stardardized freezing and storage conditions should be followed. prep wusf10.csv wusf_articles.csv wusf_articles_fixed.csv wusf_articles_tidle.csv wusf_content.csv wusf_fmteasers1.csv Segments should be attached to the cord blood for testing and confirmation of identity. prep wusf10.csv wusf_articles.csv wusf_articles_fixed.csv wusf_articles_tidle.csv wusf_content.csv wusf_fmteasers1.csv Extra cells and plasma from the cord blood should be stored for potential additional testing. prep wusf10.csv wusf_articles.csv wusf_articles_fixed.csv wusf_articles_tidle.csv wusf_content.csv wusf_fmteasers1.csv Make sure the program or bank is accredited and follows FDA regulations regarding infectious disease testing. prep wusf10.csv wusf_articles.csv wusf_articles_fixed.csv wusf_articles_tidle.csv wusf_content.csv wusf_fmteasers1.csv Cord blood units should be stored under liquid nitrogen or at equivalent temperatures.

4. If I choose to store my baby's cord blood at a private bank, what are the best companies that provide this service?

If you decide to bank your child's cord blood privately, consider the different private banks available to you. They are not all the same! Choose a private cord blood bank that is accredited and follows the above guidelines. Ask questions about the number of cord blood units released by the bank for transplantation and the outcomes of these transplantations. Also ask about the minimal volume or cell count the bank requires to process or store the cord blood.

5. What are the chances that my cord blood donation will actually be used?

If you are considering private cord blood banking, recognize that the chance of using the cord blood unit is extremely small. Furthermore, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology do not recommend private cord blood banking as there is insufficient scientific evidence to support this.

You should know that evidence exists demonstrating genetic changes responsible for leukemia in cord blood of children who have leukemia so bone marrow transplant specialists are not likely to use your infant's cord blood as a source of cells to transplant himgher for this disease.

Q&A for parents regarding Private Cord Blood Banking:

1. What are the recommended guidelinesgprocedures for cord blood banking?

- Cord blood should be collected in a bag containing citrate-phosphate-dextrose anticoagulant. - Cord blood should be processed and frozen within 48 hours of collection. - Cord blood units should be stored under liquid nitrogen or at equivalent temperatures. - Stardardized freezing and storage conditions should be followed. - Segments should be attached to the cord blood for testing and confirmation of identity. - Extra cells and plasma from the cord blood should be stored for potential additional testing.

2. Is the private bank accredited?

3. Does it follow FDA regulations regarding infectious disease testing?

4. If I choose to store my baby's cord blood at a private bank, how do I tell which company is better than the other?

If you decide to bank your child's cord blood privately, consider the different private banks available to you. They are not all the same! Choose a private cord blood bank that is accredited and follows the above guidelines.

5. How many cord blood units are released by your bank for transplantation and what are the outcomes of these transplantations?

6. What is the minimal volume or cell count the bank requires to process or store the cord blood?

7. What are the chances that my cord blood donation will actually be used?

If you are considering private cord blood banking, recognize that the chance of using the cord blood unit is extremely small. Furthermore, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology do not recommend private cord blood banking as there is insufficient scientific evidence to support this. You should know that evidence exists demonstrating genetic changes responsible for leukemia in cord blood of children who have leukemia so bone marrow transplant specialists are not likely to use your infant's cord blood as a source of cells to transplant him/her for this disease.

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