Morning Edition

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with four hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse.Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.
Schedule:

Monday - Friday 5:00 AM to 9:00 AM on WUSF 89.7

Contact Info:

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Host:
Carson Cooper

Carson Cooper is a familiar voice. He has become a favorite of WUSF listeners as the local host of NPR's "Morning Edition" on WUSF 89.7 since he took the job in 2000. Carson has worked in Tampa Bay radio for more than two decades. He has been the host of WUSF 89.7's Florida Matters since its launch in 2006. During that time he has reported on a variety of issues of importance to the community, including growth management, education, transportation, affordable housing, taxation, public health and the environment.

Host:
David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became... Read More...

Host:
Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts the program with Renée Montagne and David Greene.

Traveling from Baghdad to the wreckage of New Orleans, Inskeep has interviewed the survivors of disasters both natural and man-made. He has questioned Presidential candidates, warlords, authors, and musicians. He also interviews people who otherwise would be overlooked: a steelworker, a school board member, the mother of a soldier killed in war.

Inskeep's first full-time assignment for NPR was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the U.S. Senate, and the 2000... Read More...

Host:
Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with David Greene and Steve Inskeep.

Previously, she was the host of NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday. Prior to moving into the host position in the fall of 2012, Martin started as National Security Correspondent for NPR in May 2010. In that position she covered both defense and intelligence issues. She traveled regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Secretary of Defense, reporting on the U.S. wars and the effectiveness of the Pentagon's counterinsurgency strategy. Martin also reported extensively on the changing demographic of the U.S. military – from the debate over whether to allow women to fight in combat units... Read More...

From Morning Edition

  • Host Alex Trebek Raps 'Jeopardy!' Category
    <p>The category was "Let's Rap, Kids!" Contestants made a choice, and host Alex Trebek rapped the answer. He rapped lyrics to songs by Kanye West, Drake and others.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375476' />
  • Texas Lawmaker Riled Over Emoji Chilean Flag Mixup
    <p>The Texas flag looks a lot like the flag of Chile, which is tripping up Texans who use emojis. A state representative wants to pass a resolution saying the Chilean flag is not a stand-in when texting.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375427' />
  • Art Exhibit Doubles As Used Book Store For Spanish Speakers
    <p>A traveling Spanish bookstore has opened in Boston, its eighth and last stop. The creator says the art installation responds to the disappearance of bookstores and the "invisibility" of Spanish.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375490' />
  • McMasters Is A Solid Choice For National Security Adviser, Rep. Schiff Says
    <p>President Trump announced that Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster will be his new national security adviser. David Greene talks to Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff, who tweeted his strong approval of the pick.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375483' />
  • Ann Revel Resigns Her Seat On The Federal Election Commission
    <p>Rachel Martin talks to FEC Commissioner Ann Ravel. When she decided to resign her term on the commission early, it sets up an opportunity for President Trump to shape political spending rules.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375469' />
  • Green Card Holders Worry About Trump's Efforts To Curtail Immigration
    <p>Immigrant advocates say they've seen more interest to apply for U.S. citizenship from green card holders since President Donald Trump first announced his travel ban.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375460' />
  • Trump's New National Security Adviser Known For Speaking His Mind
    <p>After the resignation of Gen. Michael Flynn, President Trump has picked three-star Army Gen. H.R. McMaster to be national security adviser. He's known as an intellectual military strategist.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375448' />
  • National Zoo Says Bye Bye To Bao Bao
    <p>The National Zoo in Washington, D.C., bids farewell to one of its most famous residents: a panda cub named Bao Bao. The three-and-a-half year old giant panda is bound for China.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375441' />
  • Does Studying Economics Make You Selfish?
    <p>Social science research finds that students who are taught classical economics about how humans act in their rational self-interest become more likely to act selfishly after learning those lessons.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375434' />
  • France Warns Russia To Stay Out Of Its Presidential Election
    <p>The French government has warned the Kremlin of interfering in its presidential vote after signs of a disinformation and hacking campaign against a rising candidate who is not sympathetic to Russia.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=516375420' />

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