Weekend Edition Saturday

Saturday mornings are made for Weekend Edition Saturday, the program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories. The two-hour program is hosted by NPR's Peabody Award-winning Scott Simon. Drawing on his experience in covering 10 wars and stories in all 50 states and seven continents, Simon brings a humorous, sophisticated and often moving perspective to each show. He is as comfortable having a conversation with a major world leader as he is talking with a Hollywood celebrity or the guy next door. Weekend Edition Saturday has a unique and entertaining roster of other regular contributors. Marin Alsop, conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, talks about music. Daniel Pinkwater, one of the biggest names in children's literature, talks about and reads stories with Simon. Financial journalist Joe Nocera follows the economy. Howard Bryant of EPSN.com and NPR's Tom Goldman chime in on sports. Keith Devlin, of Stanford University, unravels the mystery of math, and Will Grozier, a London cabbie, talks about good books that have just been released, and what well-read people leave in the back of his taxi. Simon contributes his own award-winning essays, which are sometimes humorous, sometimes poignant. Weekend Edition Saturday is heard on WUSF and other NPR Member stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR Worldwide. The conversation between the audience and the program staff continues throughout the social media world.
Schedule:

Saturday 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM on WUSF 89.7

Contact Info:

Contact the Show

Host:
Scott Simon

Scott Simon is one of America's most admired writers and broadcasters. He has reported from all fifty states, five continents, and ten wars, from El Salvador to Sarajevo to Afghanistan and Iraq. His books have chronicled character and characters, in war and peace, sports and art, tragedy and comedy.

Simon's weekly show, Weekend Edition Saturday, has been called by the Washington Post, "the most literate, witty, moving, and just plain interesting news show on any dial," and by Brett Martin of Time-Out New York "the most eclectic, intelligent two hours of broadcasting on the airwaves." He has won every major award in broadcasting, including the Peabody, the Emmy,... Read More...

From Weekend Edition (Saturday)

  • Monday's Debate Latest In History Of (Sometimes) Memorable Encounters
    <p>The presidential debate at Hofstra University in New York is the first of three scheduled this campaign season.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495245403' />
  • Political Trends In Medicine: How Does Election Season Affect Our Health?
    <p>NPR's Scott Simon talks politics with Sally Satel, a clinical psychiatrist and medical policy expert. She follows political trends in medicine.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495295151' />
  • 'Lesser Bohemians' Uses Playful Language For A Classic Love Story
    <p>A young drama student comes to the big city and falls in love with a rakish older actor in Eimear McBride's new novel. She tells NPR a conservative publishing industry initally overlooked her work.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495206074' />
  • BANKS On What Happens When You Give Your Fans Your Phone Number
    <p>Social media isn't Jillian Banks' style, so she told her fans to text her instead. "Something that I'm still learning and have had to learn is how to put boundaries up," she says.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495049082' />
  • 'It's Familiar To All The Women In My Family:' Adapting Von Trier For The Opera
    <p>Composer Missy Mazzoli wouldn't call Lars von Trier's film <em>Breaking the Waves</em>, a feminist project. But its portrayal of a woman's experience was part of what drew her to help reimagine it onstage.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495028980' />
  • For Students In Tulsa, Pain Frames Conversation About Crutcher
    <p>Rebecca Lee teaches in Tulsa. Lee has been talking with students about their feelings after Terence Crutcher, whose daughter attends her school, was shot to death. She shared them publicly online.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495236318' />
  • The American Diplomat Who Helped Bring An End To Colombia's War
    <p>An American negotiator played a key role in helping Colombia end it's half-century war between the government and the FARC guerrillas. Here's how he did it.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495185560' />
  • Controversy Continues Over Muscular Dystrophy Drug, Despite FDA Approval
    <p>The Food and Drug Administration approved a muscular dystrophy drug despite deeply flawed evidence. Was the decision a dangerous precedent or flexible pragmatism reflecting patients' values?</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495174472' />
  • Ted Cruz Endorses Donald Trump
    <p>Ted Cruz has reversed a long held position and endorsed Donald Trump for president. Scott Simon discusses what the endorsement means with Ron Elving, senior editor for NPR's Washington Desk.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495295109' />
  • The Week In Sports
    <p>Football season has begun and there's plenty to talk about. Howard Bryant of ESPN.com talks to NPR's Scott Simon about the week in sports.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=495295172' />

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