Weekend Edition Sunday

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The program has covered news events from Nelson Mandela's 1990 release from a South African prison to the capture of Saddam Hussein. Weekend Edition Sunday debuted on January 18, 1987, with host Susan Stamberg. Two years later, Liane Hansen took over the host chair, a position she held for 22 years. In that time, Hansen interviewed movers and shakers in politics, science, business and the arts. Her reporting travels took her from the slums of Cairo to the iron mines of Michigan's Upper Peninsula; from the oyster beds on the bayou in Houma, La., to Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park; and from the kitchens of Colonial Williamsburg, Va., to the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. In January 2012, Rachel Martin began hosting the program. Previously she served as NPR National Security Correspondent and was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project. She has also been the NPR religion correspondent and foreign correspondent based in Berlin. Every week listeners tune in to hear a unique blend of news, features and the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times. Weekend Edition Sunday is heard on WUSF and other NPR Member stations across the United States and around the globe via NPR Worldwide. The conversation between the audience and the program staff continues throughout the social media world.
Schedule:

Sunday 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM on WUSF 89.7

Contact Info:

Contact the Show

Lulu Garcia-Navarro
Host:
Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday. Previously, she served as an NPR international correspondent covering South America and was based out of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

She's also served as an NPR correspondent based in Israel, reporting on stories happening throughout the Middle East. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011... Read More...

From Weekend Edition (Sunday)

  • Fashion And The First Lady
    <p>Soon-to-be First Lady Melania Trump is a former model and had her own QVC jewelry and watch collection. NPR takes a peek at the new first lady's style.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509958852' />
  • You've Got An Ace In The Hole, If You Can Find The Right Words
    <img src='https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2017/01/15/sundaypuzzle-widecrop_wide-8b3d72cd8e503c6fad20ce59a69452b623a792b6.jpg?s=600' alt='Sunday Puzzle.'/><p>This week's puzzle presents definitions that give clues to a common phrase.</p><p>(Image credit: NPR)</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509914151' />
  • Vidya Vox Muses On Fusing Music Across Cultures
    <p>Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with Vidya Iyer, who goes by Vidya Vox, an Indian-born American singer who blends her two identities through YouTube music videos that amass millions of views worldwide.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509937077' />
  • How To Tell A Story Through Emails
    <p>Hey Harry, Hey Matilda is a funny and sometimes icky story of twins. It's told through the twins' emails and unfolds around a lie. Author Rachel Hulin tells Lulu Garcia-Navarro about her new novel.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509937070' />
  • For This Announcer, It's The Inaugural Inauguration
    <p>Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with Steve Ray, a Trump supporter who is the new announcer for the presidential inauguration parade. He is replacing the man who did the job for 60 years.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509937063' />
  • 'Pretty Big Movement' Takes On Dance Company Stereotypes
    <p>A video of a dance company in New York has gone viral, with over 7 million views. Akira Armstrong explains why she founded the dance company for "full-figured" women, called "Pretty Big Movement."</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509937056' />
  • A Testy Week Between Trump And The Media
    <p>The relationship between Donald Trump, members of his staff, and members of the press has been tested during a week of heated exchanges.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509937049' />
  • 'Peace Ball' Takes Different Approach To Inauguration Festivities
    <p>Washington, D.C. community activist and restaurateur Andy Shallal talks about organizing the alternative inaugural ball, to be held at the National Museum of African American History and Culture.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509937042' />
  • Visitors To D.C. Prepare For Inauguration
    <p>We talked with some of the many people from out of town who are visiting Washington, D.C. to see Donald Trump's inauguration.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509937035' />
  • Richmond, Va. Welcomes Youngest Mayor In Its History
    <p>Levar Stoney recently began serving as mayor of Richmond, Va. at age 35. He talks with Lulu Garcia-Navarro about his challenges and plans for the city in the next year.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=509937028' />

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