Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition

Map of FL, illustrating the Wildlife Corridor
On January 17, 2012, The FL Wildlife Corridor Expedition team kicked off a 1000 mile expedition over a 100 day period to increase public awareness of the need to protect and restore Florida's Wildlife habitat.

Bear biologist Joe Guthrie, conservationist Mallory Lykes Dimmitt, and photojournalist Carlton Ward Jr. trekked from the Everglades National Park toward Okefenokee National Forest in southern Georgia. The trio traversed the wildlife habitats, watersheds and participating working farms and ranches, which comprise the Florida Wildlife Corridor opportunity area.

The team documented its journey through photography, video streams, radio reports, daily updates on social media and digital networks, and a host of activities for reporters, landowners, celebrities, conservationists, politicians and other guests. Award-winning cinematographer Elam Stoltzfus produced a film about the expedition and the Florida Wildlife Corridor.

Join the trio on their expedition through audio and video reports available below. . All Reports are made possible by our production sponsor, The Mosaic Company.


Latest Video

Slide Show

A 1,000 Mile Ride With the FL Wildlife Corridor Expedition
by WUSF News Reporter, Steve Newborn.

awesome sunset on southern FL coastline
A group of four explorers spent 100 days walking and kayaking the length of Florida, from the tip of the Everglades to the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia. Their mission – to publicize the need to connect the state’s remaining wild areas into a continuous corridor. WUSF’s Steve Newborn followed their 1,000-mile journey, and brings you some snapshots from the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition.


Recent News Updates

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition has emerged from the wilderness and is now skirting around Orlando's suburban sprawl. The group recently stopped at the Disney Wilderness Preserve on horseback, and they received an unexpected gift - from President Obama.

You'd think that wading through some of the most impenetrable swamps in Florida and traveling 1,000 miles from the Everglades to Georgia would be tough enough. But sometimes the worst thing members of the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition have to deal with is the weather.

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition neared civilization today. The group stopped at a wilderness preserve on the edge of Orlando’s sprawl, where they received an unexpected gift - from President Obama.

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition is nearing the halfway mark of their trip up the length of Florida - 1,000 miles in 100 days. Their mission is to publicize the need to connect the state's disjointed wild areas into a continuous wildlife corridor.

There are more than just birds and alligators being encountered by the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition as they make their way up the middle of Florida. Try bombs. And jets. And attack helicopters.

It all starts with the man who designed the Brooklyn Bridge. His grandson - John Roebling II - inherited more than 1,000 acres in Highlands County, and gave it to Richard Archbold, an aviator and explorer of exotic places such as Madagascar and New Guinea. It's now Archbold Biological Station.

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition has just come out of one of the wildest places in Florida - if not the entire country - the Fakahatchee strand. We also speak with Mallory Lykes Dimmitt on how the Babcock Ranch Preserve is faring as a publically-run ranch.

The Florida Panther is fighting its way back from the brink of extinction, and members of the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition are seeing signs of the panther in their travels.

A new study has some shocking news about wildlife in the Everglades. Raccoon and opossum sightings are down by 99 percent. Marsh rabbits and brown bunnies can’t be found at all. Sightings of bobcats, foxes and deer are also way down.

A group of wildlife conservationists are currently traversing the length of Florida by kayak, bicycle - and on foot. It's one thousand miles in one hundred days, and WUSF is keeping up with the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition.

Recent Episode Updates

Carlton Ward and Joe Guthrie, right, paddle the Everglades

They kayaked, biked and hiked 1,000 miles in 100 days last year through the heart of natural Florida. The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition is now ready to show the world what they encountered. On Sunday, March 3, the premiere of their one-hour documentary will be held outside the Tampa Bay History Center. Florida Matters' Steve Newborn caught up with expedition leader Carlton Ward Jr. of Tampa and filmmaker Elam Stoltzfus recently at Bok Tower Gardens in Lake Wales for a preview of what we can expect to see.

Everglades Sunset

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition crossed the finish line nearly 100 days after setting off in the Everglades on a 1,000-mile journey to the Georgia state line. Their goal - inspiring the creation of a permanent unbroken wildlife corridor.

Wildlife photographer Carlton Ward Jr., filmmaker Elam Stoltzfus, bear biologist Joe Guthrie and conservationist Mallory Lykes Dimmitt have wrapped up the traveling part of their Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Now, they have to make their vision a reality.

WUSF was one of the sponsors of the trip. Reporter Steve Newborn has been following the group since they left the tip of the Everglades. We chronicle the progress of the expedition, hear from the "Cowboy Poet" on a ranch in Central Florida, and talk with the members about the highlights of the trip - and its future - as they paddle up the Suwanee River, near their final destination in Georgia's Okefenokee Swamp.

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition is nearing the halfway mark of their trip up the length of Florida - 1,000 miles in 100 days. Their mission is to publicize the need to connect the state's disjointed wild areas into a continuous wildlife corridor. Carlton Ward Jr., Joe Guthrie, Mallory Lykes Dimmitt and Elam Stoltzfus discuss some of the surprises they found on the trip so far. Those include carrying 60-pound packs through the middle of palmetto patches - and how their preconceptions about the trip have jibed with the realities of traversing the length of Florida.

Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition
One thousand miles. That's how far a group of people will be walking through the heart of Florida. And they'll do it for 100 days straight - through swamps, cattle pasture and subdivisions on the creeping edge of suburbia.

They're not just doing it to get their feet wet. It's called the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition.

They're doing it to focus public attention on protecting connected wild areas to create a wildlife corridor from the Everglades to Georgia. Much of that corridor has been fragmented, leaving many animals vulnerable in much of their natural range.

They'll trek through the Shark Valley Slough, delve into the watery heart of the Everglades, skirt around Lake Okeechobee and slog up the Kissimmee River Valley.

The team will document the corridor through photography, video streams, radio reports as well as daily updates on social media and digital networks.

We recently spoke with photojournalist Carlton Ward Jr., documentary filmmaker Elam Stoltzfus and bear biologist Joe Guthrie as they prepared for the journey.

You can learn more about the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition by going to their web site.

Reports on the progress of the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition will air on both WUSF 89.7 and WUSF TV. All Reports are made possible by our production sponsor, Mosaic.
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