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Format: 2014-04-19
Format: 2014-04-19
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WUSF's project Health News Florida takes an in-depth look at the impact of the Affordable Care Act in our state. We speak to one uninsured woman and her doctor and two health policy experts.
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Unidentified Woman #23 (Blonde Hair & Dog), 1986 Polaroid by Andy Warhol
From Andy Warhol's "15 minutes" concept to the work of modern artists like Tina Barney & Alec Soth, celebrity and intimacy captured in a single instant has been one of the hallmarks of photography. University Beat on WUSF TV takes a look at a pair of exhibitions currently on display at the USF Contemporary Art Museum.

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Drs. Pallavi and Kiran Patel & USF President Judy Genshaft (photo by Mark Schreiner)
Thanks to a 12 million dollar endowment, the University of South Florida will soon be home to the Patel College of Global Sustainability. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 talks to some of the people behind the new college, which hopes to improve the lives of some of the world’s most vulnerable people.
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Warhol Exhibition
USF Contemporary Art Museum website
813-974-4133
The Andy Warhol Legacy Project & The Importance of Being Photographed run through December 15th

Patel College
Patel College of Global Sustainability website
813-974–9694

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USF Contemporary Art Museum curator Jane Simon talks about The Andy Warhol Legacy Project, on display through December 15th.

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Dr. Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy, Executive Director of the Patel College of Global Sustainability, talks about what the College's predecessor, the Patel School, has accomplished in the last two years.

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One for the Books: 20th Annual Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading
For two decades, the Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading has celebrated books with author talks, a street festival and book sale. This year's main event is Saturday, Oct. 20, at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Join Carson Cooper for a conversation with Tampa Bay Times book editor Colette Bancroft. We'll also hear readings from three participating authors, visit Inkwood Books in South Tampa and hear what's on the nightstands of WUSF listeners. To see the full schedule, go to festivalofreading.com. And to see a slideshow of local librarians' favorite places to curl up with a good book, click here.
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Journalist Saundra Amrhein reads an excerpt from her book "Green Card Stories," which features profiles of 50 immigrants from around the world. Amrhein, a Brandon resident, is completing a master’s degree in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of South Florida.

Eliot Schrefer reads from his new novel "Endangered," about a girl who must save a group of bonobos--and herself--from a violent coup in the Congo. The book is a National Book Award finalist for young people's literature. Schrefer, a graduate of 1997 graduate of Countryside High School, now lives in New York City.

Peter Meinke, poet laureate of St. Petersburg and a fellow in the Florida Studies Program at USF St. Petersburg, reads his poem "In Gentler Times." Meinke is the author of “The Shape of Poetry: A Practical Guide to Writing and Reading Poems.” reads his poem “In Gentler Times.”

Orlando journalist Bob Kealing reads from his book "Calling Me Home: Gram Parsons and the Roots of Country Rock."

Karen Brown, creative writing instructor at the University of South Florida and author of “Little Sinners,” a collection of short stories, reads an excerpt from the title story, “The Longings of Wayward Girls." The story will be turned into a novel, set to be published next summer.

Tampa author Enid Shomer reads an excerpt from her debut novel, "The Twelve Rooms of the Nile." This recording was done before a live audience at Inkwood Books in South Tampa.

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The cast of USF's production of "Hairspray" rehearses
"Hairspray," a musical tale of dancing and dreams set in 1960's Baltimore, opens the curtain for a nine show run at USF October 11-21. University Beat on WUSF TV takes us behind the scenes of a show that draws from both John Waters' original 1988 movie and the award-winning Broadway musical.

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Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading (courtesy USF St. Petersburg News)
The Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading celebrates its 20th anniversary this Saturday, October 20th on the USF St. Petersburg campus. In conjunction with Florida Matters, this week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 has a preview of the Festival. Interviews include St. Pete’s poet laureate, an author who teaches creative writing at USF, and a bookstore manager who’s speaking at the Festival about the growing field of electronic books.
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Hairspray
Hairspray website

October 17th-20th at 8pm, October 21st at 3pm
Theatre 1 on the USF Tampa Campus

Tickets $15 students/seniors, $20 general admission

USF Box Office 813-974-2323

Festival of Reading
Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading website

October 20th, 10 am - 4 pm, USF St. Petersburg

Florida Matters previews the Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading

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USF senior Briana Moten, who plays "Motormouth Maybelle," performs "I Know Where I've Been" from the musical Hairspray.

Costume designer Marilyn Bertch takes us on a tour of USF Theatre's costume shop, which is producing over a hundred outfits for Hairspray.

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University Beat’s Mark Schreiner interviews St. Petersburg Poet Laureate, author Peter Meinke.

USF Creative Writing teacher Karen Brown reads from her short story “Little Sinners” and talks about some of the advice she gives her students and other aspiring writers.

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Panelists at St. Petersburg College's Seminole Campus
There's more than just the contest for president and local races on the ballot in November. There will be 11 proposed amendments to the Florida Constitution. And every single one was put there by lawmakers in Tallahassee. A panel discussion was recently held at St. Petersburg College in Seminole. We'll hear from Tara Newsom, professor of Social and Behavioral Science, St. Petersburg College; Aaron Sharockman, a political editor at the Tampa Bay Times; Tony Carvajal of the Collins Center for Public Policy in Tallahassee; and Judithanne Scourfield McLauchlan, a political science professor at USF St. Petersburg. The moderator is Frank Alcock, a professor of political science at New College of Florida. (This episode does not include the five proposed amendments dealing with property taxes. To listen to our previous Florida Matters on those amendments, click HERE.) To read more about all 11 Florida Constitutional Amendments on the ballot, including the pros and cons of each measure, go to the Collins Center 2012 Proposed Constitutional Amendments website. Or, you can go to the Florida Division of Elections website to read the language that will be on the ballot.
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The cast of USF's production of "Hairspray" rehearses
"Hairspray," a musical tale of dancing and dreams set in 1960's Baltimore, opens the curtain for a nine show run at USF October 11-21. University Beat on WUSF TV takes us behind the scenes of a show that draws from both John Waters' original 1988 movie and the award-winning Broadway musical.

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The cast of USF's production of "Hairspray" rehearses
Tracy Turnblad, her doting mother Edna, dreamboat Link Larkin, and the Nicest Kids in Town are coming to USF, as the School of Theater and Dance presents the musical "Hairspray," opening this week. This week's University Beat on WUSF 89.7 speaks to two of the show’s stars, the director and costume designer about one of the biggest musicals USF has ever produced.
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Hairspray website

October 11th-13th & 17th-20th at 8pm
October 14th & 21st at 3pm
Theatre 1 on the USF Tampa Campus

Tickets $15 students/seniors, $20 general admission

USF Box Office 813-974-2323

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USF senior Briana Moten, who plays "Motormouth Maybelle," performs "I Know Where I've Been" from the musical Hairspray.

Costume designer Marilyn Bertch takes us on a tour of USF Theatre's costume shop, which is producing over a hundred outfits for Hairspray.

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20-year old Rachel Parks has been taking care of her mother since she was 17.
Why do students drop out of high school, and what can be done to prevent it? One answer to that question is that they drop out to take care of sick family members. More than 22 percent of high school dropouts left school to take care of someone else. This week’s Florida Matters focuses on the problem and what help is available for these youth caregivers. Panel members Dr. Donna Cohen with the Department of Child and Families at the University of South Florida and Elizabeth Olden, the mother of a youth caregiver, share their insight and expertise on the topic.
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USF St. Petersburg Student Center (courtesy USF St. Pete News)
With countless places for students to gather, along with a residence hall that houses 200, USF St. Petersburg’s new Student Center is the latest step in the process to turn the University from a commuter school to a destination campus where young people both live and learn. University Beat on WUSF TV takes you inside the new Center.

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Award-winning panelists at 2012 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings (courtesy Physics World)
This past summer, three USF physics graduate students were selected to attend an event in Germany that lets young researchers hear from and meet more than 25 Nobel Laureates. What makes this even more remarkable is that USF had as many or more students chosen than M-I-T, Caltech and Yale! This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 talks to two of these graduate students about their experiences and to the head of the USF Physics Department about his school’s success.
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USF St. Petersburg Student Center
USF St. Petersburg website

Nobel Trip
2012 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings webpage

USF Department of Physics website
813-974-2871

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Between the three of them, USF Physics graduate students Aaron Landerville, Evan Lafalce and Joseph Fogarty have published a total of 12 papers that have been cited 52 times by various journals. Aaron and Evan explain the kind of physics they’re studying, while Department of Physics Chairman, Professor Pritish Mukherjee talks about Fogarty’s focus.

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Florida’s property tax code resembles the finest Swiss cheese - it’s so full of holes - says one academic. And voters have an opportunity to add more property tax exemptions when they go to the polls November 6th. Five of the 11 proposed Florida Constitutional Amendments lower property taxes on selected populations. Voters will decide if they want to expand exceptions and give tax breaks to senior citizens, disabled veterans, small business owners and new home buyers. If approved by 60 percent of voters, it will mean paying less for some. But, as one county commissioner puts it, when somebody pays less there’s always somebody who has to pay more. Counties, cities and many agencies that depend on property taxes as their major source of revenue are worried about further big exemptions. The concern is that further erosion of their property tax base will force either cuts in services or increases in mileage rates which means everybody ends up paying. This week on Florida Matters State Sen. Mike Bennett of Bradenton and New College political science professor and former Collins Center Fellow Frank Alcock discuss those amendments. If there was ever a Florida election where voters may want to consider doing some homework - this is it. Here are the five Florida Constitutional Amendments that pertain to property taxes courtesy of information from the Collins Center for Public Policy: Amendment 2 – Disabled veterans who entered the military when not a Florida resident would become eligible for a property tax discount commiserate with their disability. Disabled veterans who lived in Florida when they joined the service currently receive this property tax discount. Other requirements for the tax discount: the veteran must be a current Florida resident, 65 or older and disabled in combat. Amendment 4 – It is 663 words long and has four main components: - Property value decline – known as the “recapture rule” – it doesn’t allow property taxes to go up on homestead properties and specified non-homestead property when property values are going down. - Property tax limitations – it gives new home buyers – defined as someone who has not owned a homestead property for the past three years – a discount of 50 percent on an assessed value above the $50,000 standard homestead exemption. The discount would phase out over five years. - Non-homesteaded assessments – currently capped at 10 percent annual assessments on non-homestead property would be reduced to a 5 percent cap. Homestead properties have a 3 percent cap. - Delay of scheduled repeal – currently set for 2019, repeal of the non-homestead tax exemptions and limitations would be pushed to 2023. Amendment 9 – This would grant a full property tax exemption to the surviving spouses of military veterans who die while on active duty and to the surviving spouses of first responders who die in the line of duty. Military spouses already have this full exemption but it’s only in state statute. This expands the benefit to surviving spouses of police, firefighters, and emergency responders and places it permanently in the constitution. Amendment 10 – This doubles the exemption from $25,000 to $50,000 for individuals and businesses that pay tangible personal property taxes. It also gives local governments the ability to further expand the personal property tax exemptions. Amendment 11 – Senior citizens are already receive an additional exemption. But this amendment gives additional exemptions to low-income seniors who have lived in their home for more than 25 years. To read more about all 11 Florida Constitutional Amendments on the ballot, including the pros and cons of each measure, go to the Collins Center 2012 Proposed Constitutional Amendments website.
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USF St. Petersburg Student Center (courtesy USF St. Pete News)
With countless places for students to gather, along with a residence hall that houses 200, USF St. Petersburg’s new Student Center is the latest step in the process to turn the University from a commuter school to a destination campus where young people both live and learn. University Beat on WUSF TV takes you inside the new Center.

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Ribbon cutting at USF St. Petersburg Student Center
USF St. Petersburg continues its transition from a ‘commuter school’ to a 'destination' college campus with a brand new, 21 million dollar Student Center. The Center, which also includes a six story residence hall, was built in part with a fee pushed for by a number of students. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 takes you to the recent dedication ceremony and talks to some behind the building effort.
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USF St. Petersburg website

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Piano at USF School of Music
USF faculty are putting the old joke about “practice, practice, practice” being the best way to get to Carnegie Hall to the test. A teacher from the School of Music is teaming with a pair of Department of Communication Sciences researchers to look at what piano training can teach us about how we learn. We’ll have more on University Beat on WUSF TV.

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USF College of Business Dean Moez Limayem (courtesy USF College of Business)
There’s a new leader of the Bulls’ business herd, and he brings an international pedigree with him. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 introduces you to Moez Limayem, who was recently named dean of USF’s College of Business.
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Musical Training Research
USFmusicstudy@gmail.com
813-434-3282

New Business Dean
Moez Limayem
Dean, USF College of Business
813-974-4281 website

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Carson Cooper, left, with Steve Murawski, Gil McRae and Jackie Dixon
It's been just over two years since the Deepwater Horizon well was capped, ending the largest oil spill in U.S. history. But is it really over? The largest gathering of scientists since the spill met over the weekend at the Tradewinds Island Resort in St. Pete Beach to discuss the damage to the Gulf - and what may yet happen. The Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Symposium was billed as the first summit to bring together marine scientists, recreational and commercial fishermen - as well as government agencies - to determine what's happened to the biology of the Gulf during the last two years. Part of their discussion was about the safety of eating Gulf seafood and long-term damage to the fisheries. Florida Matters traveled to the symposium on St. Pete Beach to talk to some of the speakers.
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Sam Gibbons, left, with John F. Germany
Sam Gibbons was re-elected to Congress 16 times, and never lost an election. That came after he parachuted behind enemy lines on D-Day in Normandy, during one of the most harrowing invasions of World War II. He was instrumental in getting the University of South Florida off the ground. He also helped the then-small town of Tampa expand to the limits of the university. And he rode in President John F. Kennedy's convertible limousine through Tampa in 1963 - the last stop before that fateful ride in Dallas. Sam Gibbons is now 92. He rolls around in a wheelchair now, a long way from the days he strode as a political giant in Tampa. He appeared before a standing-room-only crowd recently with former circuit judge John F. Germany at the downtown library that bears his friend's name.
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Piano at USF School of Music
USF faculty are putting the old joke about “practice, practice, practice” being the best way to get to Carnegie Hall to the test. A teacher from the School of Music is teaming with a pair of Department of Communication Sciences researchers to look at what piano training can teach us about how we learn. We’ll have more on University Beat on WUSF TV.

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Student receives piano training at USF School of Music
It sounds like an infomercial pitch: “learn to play piano in two weeks!”—but it’s actually a project developed by USF’s School of Music and the Department of Communication Sciences. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 tells you how researchers are studying young and old piano students to find out more about the nature of how we learn.
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Protester at TECO's Big Bend Power Plant (photo by Mark Schreiner, WUSF 89.7 News)
It was Tampa's big turn on the international stage -- hosting the Republican National Convention. These are some of the best stories from the RNC, including: - What do protesters do at night? - What are Republicans doing to attract Hispanics? - Can juvenile Palmetto bugs really carry people away? (and other media myths about Tampa)
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Scientific League of Superheroes 'business card' (courtesy Superhero Training Network)
What happens when you cross science and superheroes? You get the “Scientific League of Superheroes”—a collection of USF PhD students who don costumes to teach elementary school students science, technology, engineering and math, both in person and in comic book-like videos. This week's rebroadcast of University Beat on WUSF TV introduces you to the League and shows you how young people are responding to their unusual teaching methods.

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When it comes to knowledge, the “Scientific League of Superheroes” is mightier than the Avengers and more uncanny than the X-Men. This week’s rebroadcast of WUSF's University Beat from earlier this summer introduces you to a trio of USF doctoral students who’ve assumed the superhero identities of MegaByte, Sublimation and Super Conductor to teach science, technology, engineering and math to elementary school students.
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Superhero Training Network YouTube video page
Superhero Training Network webpage
Scientific League Inc. (business component of program) webpage
Superhero Training Network Facebook page

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Protester at TECO's Big Bend Power Plant is cut from a pipe he locked his arm inside (photo by Mark Schreiner)
The eyes of the world were on Tampa for the Republican National Convention. So, how'd we do? We look at the protests that never materialized, the economic winners and losers, and the political impact of the RNC on Tampa Bay and Florida.
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After months of preparations, the Republican National Convention is coming to town. Our region’s reputation is riding on whether the convention is labeled a success. So, are we ready? Joining us to answer that question is James Davis. He’s communications director for the 2012 Republican National Convention; Ken Jones, the President and CEO of the 2012 Tampa Bay Host Committee for the Republican National Convention. Tampa Police Chief Jane Castor says yes, they are as ready as they can be. As she told WUSF’s Craig Kopp, they’ve been learning lessons from previous conventions and the NATO summit in Chicago earlier this year. So, how about the protesters? WUSF’s Steve Newborn spoke with Mick Kelly of Minnesota. He’s with the Coalition to March on the RNC, and helped organize the 2008 RNC Protest in St. Paul. Some people may protest, but others want to show their support for Mitt Romney at the Republican National Convention. WUSF’s Sarah Curran found one of them. Finally, the impact on the business community is predicted to be huge – and the Tampa Bay Business Journal is gearing up to measure the convention’s economic impact. WUSF’s Bobbie O’Brien spoke recently with Tampa Bay Business Journal Editor Alexis Muellner.
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Two of the featured pieces in "Art of the Poison Pens" (Courtesy of the Mahan Collection, Special Collections, USF Tampa Library)
Since he was 12 years old, USF College of Public Health Dean Emeritus Charles Mahan has collected political cartoons. Now, a small portion of the 8,000 pieces he’s assembled are on display at the Tampa Museum of Art. University Beat on WUSF TV introduces you to Mahan and gives you a look at a few of the exhibit’s highlights.

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Political cartoons on display at the Tampa Museum of Art
Political cartoons were the talk show hosts and websites of yesterday. Now, a USF faculty member has amassed quite a collection of cartoons that, with the help of the USF Library, is being displayed at the Tampa Museum of Art. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 explores the exhibit and finds out how this art has developed over the years, while seemingly always having an effect on political discourse.
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Guide to the Guide to the USF Library of Special & Digital Collection’s Mahan Collection of American Humor and Cartoon Art 1838-2005

Art of the Poison Pens: A Century of American Political Cartoons is on display at the Tampa Museum of Art through September 16th.

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Larry Bush, collection curator & cartoon historian, shows University Beat's Mark Schreiner some of the featured pieces in Art of the Poison Pens: A Century of American Political Cartoons, on display at the Tampa Museum of Art through September 16.

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When the Republican National Convention comes to town, it’s going to affect our traffic, our security, and our economy. But will it affect how Florida votes in November? The conventional wisdom about political conventions is that where you hold it, matters at the ballot box. But academic experts are skeptical. So, what will be the effect of the Republican National Convention on the election in Florida? We’ve got several folks here to help us answer that question. Hoe Brown is Hillsborough County Chairman of Romney for President. April Schiff is President of Strategic Solutions, a political consulting company in Tampa. WUSF’s John O’Connor is one-half of our award-winning education reporting team, StateImpact Florida. And Aaron Sharockman is the deputy politics and government editor for the Tampa Bay Times.
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USF Advanced Visualization Center video wall
From Mayan monuments and dinosaur fossils to jellyfish x-rays and human CT scans, the Advanced Visualization Center is changing how USF students and faculty see things. University Beat on WUSF TV takes you inside the Center, where a huge 3-D video wall is putting the world around us in a whole new focus.

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USF students Samantha Stratton (left) and Demelza Hays (inset)
Demelza Hays is USF’s Outstanding Graduate of the summer semester and a recipient of a prestigious Fulbright Scholar research grant as an undergraduate student. Samantha Stratton is one of 13 students from around the state chosen as a Florida Gubernatorial Fellow, allowing them to work in the Governor’s Office for nine months. Meet these two incredible students on this week's University Beat on WUSF 89.7.
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Advanced Visualization Center
Howard Kaplan
USF Visualization Specialist
813-974-3419 howardkaplan@usf.edu

Advanced Visualization Center website
USF’s Alliance for Integrated Spatial Technologies website

Scholarship Students
USF Office of National Scholarships
813-974-3087 nationalscholarships@usf.edu
website

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Samantha Stratton & Demelza Hays talk to Mark Schreiner about what some of the projects they're taking on in the coming school year will entail--Stratton as a Florida Gubernatorial Fellow in Tallahassee, Hays as a Fulbright Scholar doing research in India. Then, Doctor Linda Lucas talks about the University’s Office of National Scholarships, which she directs.

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It was 20 years ago, at 5 a.m., when Hurricane Andrew hit southern Florida. It caused $30 billion in damage, and it left 15 dead and more than 250,000 homeless. Those are the numbers from Hurricane Andrew. But numbers can't do justice to the human toll of the storm. This week, with help from our friends at WLRN/Miami Herald News, we look back at Andrew, and what it means for us today. WLRN reporter Rick Stone was actually working here at WUSF on August 24, 1992 -- the day Hurricane Andrew hit. He immediately travelled to south Florida and embedded himself in a relief mission trying to help storm victims. In our first segment, he remembers that trip. In segment two, WLRN's Kenny Malone speaks to one south Florida veterinarian who's still counting his losses. In our third segment, we discuss how Andrew was the costliest storm in American history, and how that led to some major changes to the state's building codes. WUSF’s Carson Cooper speaks with Dr. Tim Reinhold, senior VP for research and chief engineer for the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety in Tampa. Finally, we wrap up this special remembrance of Hurricane Andrew with a story from WLRN's Kenny Malone about the storm, a poet and his battered old radio. And that's Florida Matters for this week. Special thanks to WLRN/Miami Herald News for sharing some of their stories of the storm. You can find their special coverage of Andrew's 20th anniversary here.
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USF Advanced Visualization Center video wall
From Mayan monuments and dinosaur fossils to jellyfish x-rays and human CT scans, the Advanced Visualization Center is changing how USF students and faculty see things. University Beat on WUSF TV takes you inside the Center, where a huge 3-D video wall is putting the world around us in a whole new focus.

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Image from USF Advanced Visualization Center demo video (courtesy USF AVC)
Put together 16 high-resolution stereoscopic 3-D monitors and you get a display two to three times better than any I-MAX movie theater screen. With a device like that, you can look at objects smaller than a human hair or examine minute details of an ancient artifact. That’s the promise of the USF Advanced Visualization Center. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 takes you there.
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Howard Kaplan
USF Visualization Specialist
813-974-3419 howardkaplan@usf.edu

Advanced Visualization Center website
USF’s Alliance for Integrated Spatial Technologies website

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Lori Collins, director of USF’s Alliance for Integrated Spatial Technologies (AIST), and archaeology PhD student Joseph Evans talk about the work AIST does on ancient grounds and how the Advanced Visualization Center will assist with that work, in both the field and the classroom. They also talk about how ‘haptic technology’ will work in helping people ‘feel’ 3-D data at the Center.

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It's lost in all the hoopla surrounding the presidential campaign and the upcoming Republican National Convention. But there's another election coming up - the primaries. And outside money is flooding in like never before. WUSF's Carson Cooper chats with Peter Schorsch, who edits SaintPetersBlog, Tampa Tribune political writer William March, and veteran journalist Wayne Garcia, with the USF School of Journalism. They talk about the race for state House between Jeff Brandes and Jim Frishe in Pinellas and Hillsborough counties; the Rachel Burgin versus Tom Lee race in eastern Hillsborough; the race for Pinellas Sheriff between former Sheriff Everett Rice and interim Sheriff Bob Gualtieri; and Ronda Storms vs Rob Turner for Hillsborough Property Appraiser.
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Students work on a water filtration experiment during USF Pre-College Global Sustainability class
High school students took over USF this summer as part of the university’s first ever Pre-College initiative. University Beat on WUSF TV shows you how faculty and staff across a diverse range of subjects showed these young people what college life is like, all in the hopes of getting them to decide their futures before they ever step into a college classroom as freshmen.

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USF Advanced PR course representatives at ANGA's DC offices (courtesy Kelli Burns)
Students in a USF Public Relations class took part in a national competition to design a marketing campaign for America’s Natural Gas Alliance, and we’re not blowing hot air when we tell you they finished in second place. On this week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7, we’ll introduce you to some members of the winning team, including their secret weapon: Captain NatGas!
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USF Pre-College Recap
USF Pre-College website
813-974-4926 1-888-873-4968
precollege@usf.edu

PR Competition
Kelli Burns, Associate Professor, USF School of Mass Communications
813-974-6799 kburns@usf.edu

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USF PRE-COLLEGE RECAP
Dr. Richard Pollenz, the Director of the USF Office for Undergraduate Research & teacher of the USF Pre-College STEM Academy, says while classroom information is important to share with the high school students, lab work is the real key to keeping them interested in science and research.

PR COMPETITION
Captain NatGas, USF Senior John Eckhoff, sends a message to the ANGA Board judging the Collegiate Energy Challenge in Washington, D.C.

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Students work on a water filtration experiment during USF Pre-College Global Sustainability class
High school students took over USF this summer as part of the university’s first ever Pre-College initiative. University Beat on WUSF TV shows you how faculty and staff across a diverse range of subjects showed these young people what college life is like, all in the hopes of getting them to decide their futures before they ever step into a college classroom as freshmen.

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USF Pre-College Music program
Almost 200 high school students from around Florida got a taste of what college life is like during USF’s recent Pre-College Program. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 takes a look back at USF’s first ever comprehensive college prep initiative, which covered everything from global sustainability to music.
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USF Pre-College website
813-974-4926 1-888-873-4968
precollege@usf.edu

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Dr. Richard Pollenz, the Director of the USF Office for Undergraduate Research & teacher of the USF Pre-College STEM Academy, says while classroom information is important to share with the high school students, lab work is the real key to keeping them interested in science and research.

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Lucia's Letter is the award-winning documentary by WGCU Public Media that describes one Guatemalan teenager's trip with a coyote from Guatemala through Mexico to southwest Florida. The story is a composite of several local Mayan women's experiences of becoming a coyote's slave. All of the women were raped, starved and drugged during the trip and then sold when they arrived in the U.S. Some ended up as indentured slaves in the vegetable fields and/or in brothels. Others were sold to men they were forced to marry. This documentary tells the story of this effort through the women, trying to use Lucia's Letter to convince mothers to stop sending their daughters to the states. This version is an excerpt of the complete show. CLICK HERE to find the full one-hour documentary and more information about Lucia's Letter.
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Program

On the radio

It’s being billed as second only to the Olympics when it comes to press coverage and economic impact. In just a few weeks, the Tampa Bay area will host the Republican National Convention. But some critics say there’s no evidence that previous political conventions have paid off for local residents and some small businesses have yet to reap any dividends in Tampa. And, RNC organizers have felt the sting of criticism that small businesses did not benefit when the big political party came to town in previous years. So, the Tampa Bay Host Committee is working to change that perception and help small businesses get their piece of the pie. The Host Committee is also working with Bloomberg to set up special events during the RNC week that will partner local officials with CEOs and out-of-state business leaders to discuss future business ventures.
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