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Format: 2014-04-21
Format: 2014-04-21
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The Buried Life's Ben Nemtin (Hawaiian shirt) talks w/USF students at Speed Dating Record breaking event
Take a few hundred USF students, add a group of enterprising reality TV stars, and you’ve got a new Guinness world record! University Beat on WUSF TV shows you how the students recently set the record in a new category: largest speed dating event.

On the radio

USF Marketing Assoc. Prof. Dipayan Biswas (courtesy Bentley University Observer)
University Beat wraps up a two-part look at the work some USF professors are doing on how marketers sell us the products we use and consume. Groucho Marx once said, “Who are you going to believe, me or your lying eyes?” One USF researcher is putting that concept to the test, as he studies “sensory marketing”—how advertisers use our senses to sometimes “trick” us into buying things we might not necessarily want. Find out more on this week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7.
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Speed Dating Record
USF's Center for Student Involvement

The Buried Life's new book "What Do You Want to Do Before You Die?"

The Buried Life's list of 100 things they want to do before they die

Sensory Marketing
Dipayan Biswas, Associate Professor, USF Marketing Dept.
813-974-0797 dbiswas@usf.edu
Biography

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Ben Nemtin of The Buried Life talks with WUSF's Mark Schreiner

Guinness World Record Adjudicator Philip Robertson describes the record being set and what he looks for as a judge.

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Dipayan Biswas, Assoc. Professor in the USF Marketing Department, talks with University Beat’s Mark Schreiner about how we react to sensory marketing, the "placebo effect," and his research on how even the packaging of a product can affect how we react to it.

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The decisions made by St. Petersburg Mayor Bill Foster and the city council over the next year years will shape the city for decades to come. Specifically, Foster is trying to keep ahold of the Tampa Bay Rays, and rebuild the city's iconic Pier. Florida Matters' Carson Cooper interviewed Foster for our Newsmakers series. He asks Foster about both of those issues -- as well as his plans for cutting the budget, his feelings about Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn, and his plans for the Republican National Convention.
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Crosses mark Boot Hill Cemetery on the grounds of the Dozier School for Boys (courtesy USF News)
USF researchers are using a variety of high and low-tech means to map out a graveyard on the site of the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Florida. University Beat on WUSF TV takes you along on a search for answers that can only be found both underground and in the long-buried past.

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fMRI brain scans from the neuroscience study (courtesy Adam Craig)
For the next two weeks, University Beat on WUSF Public Media is looking at the work some USF professors are doing on how marketers sell us the products we use and consume. We all recognize misleading advertising when we see it, but what’s happening in our brains when something appears to be fishy and we can’t figure out what’s right? This week on University Beat, we talk to a marketing professor who is working with neuroscience researchers to analyze how people respond to advertising.
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Marianna Graves
Erin Kimmerle, Assistant Professor, USF Department of Anthropology
813-974-5139 kimmerle@cas.usf.edu

Advertising & Neuroscience
Adam Craig, Assistant Professor, USF Marketing Dept.
813-974-6184 adamwcraig@usf.edu

Abstract and Summary of study from June 2012's Journal of Marketing Research

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Richard Estabrook, the Regional Director for the Florida Public Archaeology Network & a faculty member in the USF Dept. of Archaeology, talks about the importance of small, historic Florida cemeteries like the one university researchers are investigating in Marianna.

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Adam Craig, Asst. Professor in the USF Marketing Department, talks with University Beat’s Mark Schreiner about what kind of brain activity the neuroscience study looked at, how children can be protected from misleading advertising, and how this kind of research is advancing in the face of marketers adapting at the same time.

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The Supreme Court says it's constitutional. But Gov. Rick Scott says he won't expand Medicaid or set up insurance exchanges envisioned by the Affordable Care Act. We break down the future of the ACA in Florida with Dr. Jay Wolfson, professor of public health and medicine at the University of South Florida; Mona Mangat of St. Petersburg of Doctors for America, and Alan Sayler, owner of Sayler's Suncoast Water of Pinellas Park and plaintiff in the state's ACA lawsuit. Find the ACA law here. Read Dr. Wolfson's blog post here.
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Crosses mark Boot Hill Cemetery on the grounds of the Dozier School for Boys (courtesy USF News)
USF researchers are using a variety of high and low-tech means to map out a graveyard on the site of the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Florida. University Beat on WUSF TV takes you along on a search for answers that can only be found both underground and in the long-buried past.

On the radio

USF graduate students 'ground-truth' in Boot Hill Cemetery on the grounds of the Dozier School for Boys (courtesy USF News)
In its lengthy & troubled history, over 80 young men died at the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Florida. Many of them were buried on the school grounds, but it’s not known exactly where. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 looks at how a team of USF researchers is now surveying the site to find the answers and give the boys’ family members the closure that has escaped them for so long.
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Erin Kimmerle, Assistant Professor, USF Department of Anthropology
kimmerle@cas.usf.edu
813-974-5139

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Richard Estabrook, the Regional Director for the Florida Public Archaeology Network & a faculty member in the USF Dept. of Archaeology, talks about the importance of small, historic Florida cemeteries like the one university researchers are investigating in Marianna.

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Scientific League of Superheroes 'business card' (courtesy Superhero Training Network)
What happens when you cross science and superheroes? You get the “Scientific League of Superheroes”—a collection of USF PhD students who don costumes to teach elementary school students science, technology, engineering and math, both in person and in comic book-like videos. University Beat on WUSF TV introduces you to the League and shows you how young people are responding to their unusual teaching methods.

On the radio

Guinness World Record Adjudicator Philip Robertson observes the record-setting effort
Almost 300 USF students recently joined a group of TV reality stars to help set a new Guinness World Record. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 takes us to the event, which asked the question: what do you want to do before you die?
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STEM Superheroes
Superhero Training Network YouTube video page
Superhero Training Network webpage
Scientific League Inc. (business component of program) webpage
Superhero Training Network Facebook page

Speed Dating Record
USF's Center for Student Involvement

The Buried Life's new book "What Do You Want to Do Before You Die?"

The Buried Life's list of 100 things they want to do before they die

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Take a few hundred USF students, add a group of enterprising reality TV stars, and you’ve got a new Guinness world record! University Beat on WUSF TV shows you how the students recently set the record in a new category: largest speed dating event.

Ben Nemtin of The Buried Life talks with WUSF's Mark Schreiner

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More than 15,000 protesters are expected to flood the city of Tampa in August for the Republican National Convention. We asked three Tampa-area activists what they stand for and what they hope to accomplish. 1. They want to send a message to the Republican Party. "The 99% are not happy with their goals and ideals," said Sky Smetzer, a member of Students for a Democratic Society in Gainesville. Jared Hamil, a member of the same group, adds, "We'll be there to say no to the Republican Agenda and we'll be also demanding five things: good jobs, health care, affordable education, equality and peace." 2. They feel like the city of Tampa hasn't treated them fairly and is trying to stifle dissent. "I think it's the city in general," Hamil said. "We had the Clean Zone and Event Zone. What it does, it not only limits things, it tries to control protesters in a way that is just undemocratic. "Just these things all together, it's pretty atrocious." 3. They want to keep the momentum of the Occupy movement going. "It created a whole new atmosphere for people," Hamil said. "People can see now there is a mass movement of people saying no to the 1 percent. "Everybody is here together. We're all related and we're all here to say no to the corporate led government." 4. They're peaceful protesters, but don't expect them to try and influence anyone who isn't. "Were going to abide by the Tampa Bay principles. They're basically a St. Paul principles that the coalition to march on the RNC in 2008 marched under," says Corey Uhl. "The standards are, each group will respect each others events as far as what is planned. If they have a different way of expressing themselves, that they do it away from our event. We won't necessarily renounce it because these are tense times."
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Scientific League of Superheroes 'business card' (courtesy Superhero Training Network)
What happens when you cross science and superheroes? You get the “Scientific League of Superheroes”—a collection of USF PhD students who don costumes to teach elementary school students science, technology, engineering and math, both in person and in comic book-like videos. University Beat on WUSF TV introduces you to the League and shows you how young people are responding to their unusual teaching methods.

On the radio

When it comes to knowledge, the “Scientific League of Superheroes” is mightier than the Avengers and more uncanny than the X-Men. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 introduces you to a trio of USF doctoral students who’ve assumed the superhero identities of MegaByte, Sublimation and Super Conductor to teach science, technology, engineering and math to elementary school students.
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Superhero Training Network YouTube video page
Superhero Training Network webpage
Scientific League Inc. (business component of program) webpage
Superhero Training Network Facebook page

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Tampa Police Chief Jane Castor says her department is prepared to deal with the tens of thousands of people who are expected to descend on Tampa for the upcoming Republican National Convention. WUSF's All Things Considered host Craig Kopp asks her what kind of unique challenges police will face - especially from thousands of protestors parading in the Florida heat. While Castor says the majority of people who come to the convention will be peaceful, police are prepared for the minority whose intentions are anything but. "The eyes of the world will be upon us," she says. Political conventions usually need from 3,500 to 4,000 police officers to maintain order, she says. But Tampa has only 1,000 officers. The rest will be coming mostly from sheriff's offices in Hillsborough, Pinellas and Polk counties - although some will be coming from as far as Miami. But just how thoroughly trained will these officers be? "Everyone is going through lengthy and in-depth crowd management training, which is provided by the Department of Homeland Security," she says. "And we actually have sent a contingent of officers from the Tampa Police department and the sheriff's office to these different agencies to train them in crowd management, to insure that everyone understands the tactics necessary and everyone understands the need to prevent any issues from occurring." She says those other officers will be supervised directly by either someone from Tampa P.D. or the Hillsborough Sheriff's Office. And outside of the area directly controlled by the Secret Service, Castor will be in charge of every officer. "I just want this to be an event that showcases all that's great about the Tampa Bay area, and law enforcement in Tampa," she says.
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The Tavros, USF's solar-powered autonomous underwater vehicle (SAUV) (courtesy USF College of Marine Science)
Researchers at USF's College of Marine Science are finding new, creative ways to use social media to share what they're learning with students and the public. University Beat on WUSF TV shows you how an underwater vehicle is using Twitter to share information it’s discovering with both researchers and the public.

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USF Biology doctoral candidate Taegan McMahon works in field on chlorothalinol study
It’s been fifty years since the book “Silent Spring” led to the banning of the pesticide DDT. Today, a pair of USF biologists is putting another one of the world’s most commonly used fungicides under the microscope. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 looks at their recently published study, which shows that freshwater ecosystems may be at serious risk from the chemical, even at levels below those previously deemed safe by the Environmental Protection Agency.
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Marine Science-Social Media
Teresa Greely, USF College of Marine Science
727-553-3921 greely@usf.edu

Teresa Greely's Adventures at Sea blog

JOIDES Resolution blog

JOIDES Resolution Facebook page

Tavros Twitter

USF EcoSystems Technology Group website
727-553-1130

Fungicide Safety
Jason Rohr, Assistant Professor, USF Dept. of Integrative Biology
813-974-0156 rohr@usf.edu

Study from July 2012's Ecology Letters on chlorothalonil's effect on freshwater ecosystems

PDF version of above

Study from August 2011's Environmental Health Perspectives on chlorothalonil's effect on amphibians

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Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn (L) and Florida Matters Host Carson Cooper (R) at Tampa City Hall.
This week, Florida Matters brings you an exclusive interview with Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn. Host Carson Cooper traveled to Tampa City Hall to talk with the first-term mayor in March. Buckhorn has been in office about a year. When he took over, the city was facing a $34 million deficit and is looking at a $30 million deficit for the coming fiscal year. Yet, Buckhorn started his discussion about the budget with praise for his predecessor, Pam Iorio, who left the city with a $120 million rainy day fund, compared to the $20 million fund she inherited. Municipalities are highly dependent on property taxes for their main revenue and the recession and housing crisis have meant shrinking revenues and growing deficits. “The property taxes and the value of our real estate has diminished so much that the amount of money that is coming into us has dropped 20 to 30 percent,” Buckhorn said. Buckhorn plans to bolster the budget with revenues from the city’s new red-light cameras, but he told WUSF that money was not the reason for installing the system. “Our rationale for putting those red-light cameras in is because red-light running in this city and this state is an epidemic and people are dying, dying as a result of people busting red lights,” Buckhorn said adding that he always counts to three after a light turns green before entering an intersection because he’s seen too many accidents. During his tenure as mayor, Buckhorn has been vocal about the Tampa Bay Rays. He’s often said he won’t be the “boyfriend” who breaks up the marriage between the Rays and the City of St. Petersburg. However, he told WUSF, “I may be the pool guy though.” Buckhorn stressed that he can’t interfere with the contract between St. Petersburg and the Rays. However, he also said that he other Tampa Bay leaders should be prepared if there was a split. “I think we need to know what our options are,” Buckhorn said. “I think we need to know what Tampa, Tampa Bay could bring to the table financially.” Speaking of finances, Buckhorn said the city will use a large portion of the $50 million from congress to hire, house and feed additional law enforcement officers to cover security for the Republican National Convention in August. Between the City of Tampa and Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office, Buckhorn estimates they can deploy about 1,000 law officers. “We are having to hire 3,000 additional law enforcement personnel from all over the state to assist us with this,” Buckhorn said. He believes the convention will be a defining moment for the city. “I want people to come downtown. I want people to enjoy this experience. I want young people to experience democracy at the street level,” Buckhorn said. “Fifteen thousand journalists will be here talking about something. I want them to talk about all that’s good about Tampa not talk about the inconveniences or not listen to whining. I want to hear Tampa tell the world what a great place this is to invest.” This Florida Matters program is a conversation from March 2012.
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The Tavros, USF's solar-powered autonomous underwater vehicle (SAUV) (courtesy USF College of Marine Science)
Researchers at USF's College of Marine Science are finding new, creative ways to use social media to share what they're learning with students and the public. University Beat on WUSF TV shows you how an underwater vehicle is using Twitter to share information it’s discovering with both researchers and the public.

On the radio

USF College of Marine Science professor Teresa Greely onboard the JOIDES Resolution in the Lesser Antilles (courtesy Teresa Greely)
USF’s College of Marine Science is increasingly using social media. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 introduces us to an instructor teaching her classes via Skype while on a research cruise…and to a solar-powered underwater vehicle that Tweets. Join us to find out how this technology is helping scientists share their knowledge about what’s going on deep below.
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Teresa Greely, USF College of Marine Science
727-553-3921 greely@usf.edu

Teresa Greely's Adventures at Sea blog

JOIDES Resolution blog

JOIDES Resolution Facebook page

Tavros Twitter

USF EcoSystems Technology Group website
727-553-1130

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As part of the American Graduate: Let’s Make it Happen initiative, WUSF Public Media has produced this special Florida Matters on the dropout crisis in Florida. We talk to a student who almost dropped out -- until his mother and a special school intervenes. We talk to teachers at a special town hall meeting in Jacksonville about their problems, frustrations and possible solutions. And we hear from one potential teacher about her reaction to hearing from these teachers. “American Graduate" partner organizations and stations include FPBS, WLRN (Miami), WJCT (Jacksonville), WFSU (Tallahassee), WDSC (Daytona), WUSF (Tampa) and WEDU (Tampa). The public media initiative, American Graduate: Let's Make It Happen is helping communities across America identify and implement solutions to address the high school dropout crisis. Made possible by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), the multi-year campaign is designed to raise awareness and dialogue through national and local multiplatform programming. More than 600 partnerships have been formed locally through American Graduate and CPB is partnering with America's Promise Alliance and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Visit American Graduate on Facebook, Twitter or AmericanGraduate.org.
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USF College of Marine Science professor Teresa Greely onboard the JOIDES Resolution in the Lesser Antilles (courtesy Teresa Greely)
Researchers at USF's College of Marine Science are finding new, creative ways to use social media to share what they're learning with students and the public. This week's University Beat looks at how one teacher used Skype to continue teaching her Honors College classes while in the middle of the ocean on a once in a lifetime research cruise.

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Can red wine change the course of Alzheimer’s disease? Not red wine specifically—but a component of it that can also be found in chocolate, berries and peanuts. The USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute is taking part in a national study that hopes to determine what part that component plays in slowing down memory deterioration. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 has all the tasty facts.
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Marine Science-Social Media Pt 1
Teresa Greely, USF College of Marine Science
727-553-3921 greely@usf.edu

Teresa Greely's Adventures at Sea blog

JOIDES Resolution blog

JOIDES Resolution Facebook page

Wine-Alzheimer's Study
USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute study line
813-974-4355

Resveratrol in Alzheimer’s Disease Study national website

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USF College of Marine Science instructor Teresa Greely talks about teaching the “Biology of Marine Life” course to Honors College undergrads at USF Tampa & USF St. Pete—students who are NOT necessarily science majors.

USF College of Marine Science instructor Teresa Greely describes what students saw when she taught via Skype while she was on a six-week mission on the research vessel, the JOIDES Resolution.

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Dr. Amanda Smith, medical director for the USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute, talks about the National Institute on Aging's double-blind, placebo-controlled Resveratrol for Alzheimer's Disease Study. She also talks about what people can get out of volunteering for clinical trials.

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MacDill Commander Col. Lenny Richoux holds up a photo of him in the cockpit of a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft. The mission was in Fall 2006 when a record-breaking 21 aircraft flew in formation over central South Carolina as seen in the photo to the right.
Monday is Memorial Day – a time when civilians and military alike will take a moment to remember those killed while serving their country. This week Florida Matters takes a look at the U.S. Military through the eyes of a base commander, a WWII veteran and a documentary producer. Col. Lenny Richoux is commander for both the U.S. Air Force 6th Air Mobility Wing and MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa. He arrived at MacDill in July 2010 and will leave for his next assignment, as a special assistant to the Supreme Allied Commander Europe Adm. James Stavridis, on July 27th. During his two years running MacDill, Richoux has overseen many changes like the building of a new Central Command Headquarters and new base housing that’s been privatized. Col. Richoux also shares a commander’s perspective on implementing major policy changes handed down from the Pentagon on increased suicide rates, the stigma of PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder, and military sexual assault. Sarah Pusateri co-produced a documentary on military sexual assault titled, Uniform Betrayal, the documentary premiered on WUSF-TV, Channel 16, and will be broadcast again on WEDU, Channel 3, on June 1st and 14th. Less than 1 percent of the U.S. population serves in the military today, but during WWII virtually every family had someone in the fight. Tampa native and retired Circuit Judge John P. “Jack” Griffin was no exception. He and his brother enlisted in WWII. Jack ended up in the Pacific as a Navy pharmacist mate – the only medical man aboard LSM 185. Jack has shared many stories with his son, Tampa attorney Chris Griffin, and next month the two of them will travel on an “Honor Flight” to Washington D.C. to visit the WWII Memorial and others together. Before that trip, he shared some of what it was like when the whole country and world was at war. For Memorial Day, Col. Richoux shared his favorite memorials that have meaning to him and his family. He often takes his son to the Air Park at MacDill AFB which has three aircraft, flown by MacDill airmen, on display. In Washington D.C., the Korean Veterans memorial is meaningful because he father, a Marine, fought in that war. “I’ve personally seen the healing,” Richoux said when his father visited the memorial. And he’s seen the same healing of Vietnam Veterans who have visited “the wall” – the nickname for the Vietnam Memorial.
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USF Graduation ceremony in newly renovated USF Sun Dome (courtesy Aimee Blodgett, USF News)
The USF Sun Dome has reopened after a 36 million dollar renovation project, and while the building still holds about 10,000 people, the capacity is just about the only thing not changed! University Beat on WUSF TV takes you on a tour of the new facility.

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USF Pre-College 2012 (courtesy USF University College)
USF isn’t just launching one summer program for high school and homeschool students, but THIRTEEN programs! This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 has a preview of the new Pre-College initiative, which is designed to get young people interested early in both college and future careers.
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Sun Dome Reopens
USF Sun Dome website

USF Pre-College
USF Pre-College website
813-974-4926 1-888-873-4968
precollege@usf.edu

Registration ends June 1, Classes run June 11-August 3

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USF Athletic Director Doug Woolard talks about the improvements made to the USF Sun Dome.

With the renovation of the USF Sun Dome being just the latest improvement to USF’s athletic facilities, the big question remains: will USF ever get an on-campus football stadium? Doug Woolard has an answer.

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USF Interdisciplinary Programs Coordinator Kathy Barnes talks to University Beat about some of the courses in USF’s Pre-College 2012 summer program, ranging from the STEM Academy residency program and Global Sustainability to Arts and Music (including the only ‘for credit’ class, a Music course administered online). She also discusses the motivations of the students who are attending the program.

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The decisions made by St. Petersburg Mayor Bill Foster and the city council over the next year years will shape the city for decades to come. Specifically, Foster is trying to keep ahold of the Tampa Bay Rays, and rebuild the city's iconic Pier. Florida Matters' Carson Cooper interviewed Foster for our Newsmakers series. He asks Foster about both of those issues -- as well as his plans for cutting the budget, his feelings about Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn, and his plans for the Republican National Convention.
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USF Graduation ceremony in newly renovated USF Sun Dome (courtesy Aimee Blodgett, USF News)
The USF Sun Dome has reopened after a 36 million dollar renovation project, and while the building still holds about 10,000 people, the capacity is just about the only thing not changed! University Beat on WUSF TV takes you on a tour of the new facility.

On the radio

Ribbon-cutting of newly renovated USF Sun Dome (courtesy USF Athletics)
Unless you’ve been in the USF Sun Dome in the last week or two, then you haven’t been in the Sun Dome! The arena has reopened after a 36 million dollar renovation, but it’s almost like a completely new building. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 has a look inside what some are calling “USF’s new front porch.”
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USF Sun Dome website

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USF Athletic Director Doug Woolard talks about the improvements made to the USF Sun Dome.

With the renovation of the USF Sun Dome being just the latest improvement to USF’s athletic facilities, the big question remains: will USF ever get an on-campus football stadium? Doug Woolard has an answer.

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The Buried Life's Ben Nemtin (Hawaiian shirt) talks w/USF students at Speed Dating Record breaking event
Take a few hundred USF students, add a group of enterprising reality TV stars, and you’ve got a new Guinness world record! University Beat on WUSF TV shows you how the students recently set the record in a new category: largest speed dating event.

On the radio

Guinness World Record Adjudicator Philip Robertson observes the record-setting effort
Almost 300 USF students recently joined a group of TV reality stars to help set a new Guinness World Record. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 takes us to the event, which asked the question: what do you want to do before you die?
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USF's Center for Student Involvement

The Buried Life's new book "What Do You Want to Do Before You Die?"

The Buried Life's list of 100 things they want to do before they die

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Ben Nemtin of The Buried Life talks with WUSF's Mark Schreiner

Guinness World Record Adjudicator Philip Robertson describes the record being set and what he looks for as a judge.

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It's been so long since Florida's been hit...do you even feel like you need to be ready? Two emergency officials say that it's not a matter of if the big one will hit...but when. Holley Wade from Hillsborough County Emergency Management and Pinellas County emergency spokesman Tom Iovino tell us what we need to do as families and communities to be prepared.
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Gov. Rick Scott during Sine Dine 2012.
On Florida Matters this week, Bobbie O'Brien talked with the state’s 45th governor about Florida Polytechnic, the Republican National Convention, and whether Florida is the most veteran-friendly state. Five things we learned from our interview with Governor Scott: 1. That Scott thinks a 12th University “makes sense” The governor has several reasons why he thinks creating a new university is a good idea. The funding was already allotted for the current USF Poly campus, it focuses state resources on STEM degrees, the Board of Governors had already approved it and “sometimes there’s a benefit from starting something from scratch.” 2. That Scott is worried about universities competing against each other Prior to 2000, there were only two medical schools in the public university system, now there are six. Scott said the Board of Governors must remember that “we’re building a system, we’re not building 12 competitors.” In 2006, the Board of Governors commissioned the Pappas Report which cautioned against “mission creep” among other concerns with the university framework. 3. That Scott wants to “do business” at Republican National Convention. Scott believes his biggest job during the four day convention is to “welcome business people who might open up jobs here.” The governor plans on “showcasing our state.” He said the selling points are: no personal income tax and he will promise a responsive state government “if you think a fee is unfair ... if a regulation doesn’t make sense ... if a permit is taking too long.” 4. That Scott plans accountability for tax incentives The governor said he reorganized the state’s economic development and tax incentive program last year. He promises that now “we measure every deal” – looking at how much is given in state tax dollars versus how much is returned in tax revenues. Yet, he said he is willing to look at and learn from the recent Pew Center report: Evidence Counts that ranks Florida among the worse states in tracking tax incentives. Evidence Counts – Evaluating State Tax Incentives for Jobs and Growth finds that 25 states and Florida are trailing and not adequately tracking the tax money and promised jobs. 5. That Scott claims the title as most veteran friendly state Scott meets with base commanders every 90 days to make sure Florida is the most military friendly state because it means jobs and he cares about the military, having served in the Navy and his dad served in the 82nd Airborne. And as the military members retire most are staying in Florida the veteran population is 1,650,000 not including the 1 million military family members. “We want jobs in our state, we a great education system in our state and to have quality people. The people coming out of the military are really great people, I want them to be in Florida.”
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A record crowd is expected at USF’s Tampa Campus May 12th for the seventh annual Miles for Moffitt. Runners, walkers and wheelchair racers will turn out in force, with all money raised going directly to research efforts at Moffitt Cancer Center. University Beat on WUSF TV has a preview.

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It’s time once again to lace up your running shoes, as Miles for Moffitt is coming up at USF on May 12th. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 has a preview of the event, which has raised over 800-thousand dollars for research at Moffitt Cancer Center.
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Miles for Moffitt
Miles for Moffitt website

Moffitt’s “Make May Moffitt Month” effort

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Miles for Moffitt President/co-founder Karen Dalton says the people who run the races and the cancer patients they run for are the reasons for the event’s success.

If you can’t make it to USF for Miles for Moffitt, Karen Dalton says you can take part ‘virtually.’

Moffitt Cancer Center’s Dr. Ken Shain talks about how the funds raised at Miles for Moffitt help researchers like him.

PNC Bank is the new title sponsor for Miles for Moffitt. Regional President Joe Meterchick gives some of the reasons why a bank that’s relatively new to the area is getting involved with Moffitt.

Florida Wildlife Expedition Looks to the Future
OKEFENOKEE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
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Everglades Sunset
The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition crossed the finish line nearly 100 days after setting off in the Everglades on a 1,000-mile journey to the Georgia state line. Their goal - inspiring the creation of a permanent unbroken wildlife corridor. Wildlife photographer Carlton Ward Jr., filmmaker Elam Stoltzfus, bear biologist Joe Guthrie and conservationist Mallory Lykes Dimmitt have wrapped up the traveling part of their Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Now, they have to make their vision a reality. WUSF was one of the sponsors of the trip. Reporter Steve Newborn has been following the group since they left the tip of the Everglades. We chronicle the progress of the expedition, hear from the "Cowboy Poet" on a ranch in Central Florida, and talk with the members about the highlights of the trip - and its future - as they paddle up the Suwanee River, near their final destination in Georgia's Okefenokee Swamp.
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A record crowd is expected at USF’s Tampa Campus May 12th for the seventh annual Miles for Moffitt. Runners, walkers and wheelchair racers will turn out in force, with all money raised going directly to research efforts at Moffitt Cancer Center. University Beat on WUSF TV has a preview.

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USF Sarasota-Manatee students outside ShelterBox tent
On first look, a “ShelterBox” appears to contain nothing more than a tent and some camping gear. In reality, it’s a collection of tools that will help a displaced family survive after a disaster. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 visits a group of students who spent two nights in a ShelterBox tent on the USF Sarasota-Manatee campus to raise funds for the Bay area-based organization behind this worldwide life-saving effort.
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Miles for Moffitt
Miles for Moffitt website

ShelterBox
ShelterBox website

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Miles for Moffitt President/co-founder Karen Dalton says the people who run the races and the cancer patients they run for are the reasons for the event’s success.

If you can’t make it to USF for Miles for Moffitt, Karen Dalton says you can take part ‘virtually.’

Moffitt Cancer Center’s Dr. Ken Shain talks about how the funds raised at Miles for Moffitt help researchers like him.

PNC Bank is the new title sponsor for Miles for Moffitt. Regional President Joe Meterchick gives some of the reasons why a bank that’s relatively new to the area is getting involved with Moffitt.

Audio extras
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John Freeman, a USF doctoral student & a ShelterBox response team volunteer, talks about the history of the ShelterBox organization, the areas he’s been dispatched to, and what volunteers get out of their experience.

Robin Danzak, a USF Sarasota-Manatee Asst. Prof. of Communication Sciences & Disorders, talks about who stayed in the ShelterBox tent and the kind of support they got from the University community.

USF Sarasota-Manatee Psychology major Shawna Machado shares the reactions from students and local residents who stopped by the ShelterBox site, what she got out of the experience, and what it’s like sleeping outside across the street from an airport.

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