On Demand - Video Content

Format: 2014-04-18
Format: 2014-04-18

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Students in a USF St. Petersburg Political Science course are seeing what a real election campaign is like as interns for mayoral and city council candidates. Join them as this week's University Beat goes from the classroom to the campaign trail for some "practical politics."
For more information: 

Dr. Judithanne Scourfield McLauchlan, Department of Political Science, USF St. Petersburg
E-mail: jsm2@stpt.usf.edu or 727-873-4956

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USF Assoc. Professor of Political Science Dr. Judithanne Scourfield McLauchlan explains how the campaign internship component of "Practial Politics" works.

St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Baker and non-degree seeking student Katie Heffner talk about the advantages of the relationship between USF St. Pete and the city.

Katie Heffner and Political Science Senior Chuck Terzian answer the question: "Why local politics?"

Chuck Terzian says it's important for younger people to get involved in politics.

Program

Asolo Theater
This week we explore the beautiful ways Floridians are preserving the historic structures in our area. We'll go inside an 18th century Italian theatre, that has called Sarasota "home" for over 50 years. And we'll head to Polk county for a trip down memory lane, where Elvis Presley and Judy Garland were known to stop by. Then Larry Elliston takes us back to St. Petersburg's "yesteryear" to show us how what's old is new again.

On the radio

American flag, dog tags and a military uniform
While the explosions and bursts of light this weekend will make us "ooh" and "ahh," that's not the case for thousands of troops fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. This week on Florida Matters, meet some local members of the military who reflect with us about what the Fourth of July holiday means to them and why they chose to serve in the armed forces.
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Cpl. Miguel Delgado and Capt. Michael Hartford offer advice to students who might be considering military service. (1:43)

Listen to Annette Fly explain how she and her husband keep in touch with her son Garrett during his first weeks at the Air Force Academy. (0:59)

Col. Ron Fly, whose son just departed for the Air Force Academy, talks about what Independence Day means to him. (0:41)

Nancy Nelson talks about learning to become a military family now that her son Robert is attending the Air Force Academy. (0:24)

Nelson describes how her son decided to go to the Air Force Academy and how she worked to support him in that decision. (1:39)

April 10, 2009

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The University of South Florida is the first school in the nation to team with the Department of Veterans Affairs in an effort to support returning troops who enroll for classes under the new G-I Bill this fall. This week's University Beat takes a closer look at "VetSuccess on Campus" and how it's going to help those who've served our country.
For more information: 

Kristin Adams, USF Representative, VetSuccess on Campus
E-mail: kristin.adams@va.gov or 813-974-9281

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At a ceremony marking the signing of the "VetSuccess on Campus" agreement between USF and the Department of Veterans Affairs, USF President Dr. Judy Genshaft talks about what the University can do for returning troops and other veterans.

Admiral Patrick Dunne, the Department of Veterans Affairs' Under Secretary for Benefits, says veterans bring something different to a classroom and university campus.

Kristin Adams, the VA's VetSuccess on Campus USF Representative, talks about his experiences as both a veteran and a USF graduate.

Program

woman voting
This week we're going through the many levels of civic engagement that you can find in Florida. Carson Cooper introduces us to the up-and-coming political &new-wave," and describes how the use of high-tech social networking is becoming the norm. Irene Mayer talks with members of a Pasco County group, Protectors of Florida’s Legacy, that succeeded in turning down a Class 1 Landfill proposal in Dade City. The group argued that the project would have potentially damaged the natural resources in the area, and created an eyesore for the community. Irene also sits down with a community organizer from the NAACP, and a local activist from Florida Voices for Animals, to see how they use different approaches to achieve their goals. Larry Elliston introduces us to Stefani Busansky. Inspired by her daughter's 2001 diagnosis of cerebral palsy, Busansky turned her dream of a playground where kids of all abilities could play together into a reality.

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kid being bullied
After a group of middle school students sexually assaulted one of their peers, many parents started to wonder: how bad is bullying i our schools? We look at what's going on in schools and why doctors now consider bullying a health issue. And we consider whether there are links between the schoolyard bully and the adult who bullies co-workers.
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Irene Maher speaks with Pasco County activists from Protectors of Florida's Legacy, a group that succeeded in turning down a Class 1 Landfill proposal in Dade City. Members of the group argued that the project would have potentially damaged the natural resources in the area, creating an eyesore for the community.

Florida Matters host Irene Maher sits down with two community organizers - Don Brown from the NAACP's Florida Conference, and Nikki Benoit from Florida Voices for Animals - to discuss how they use different approaches to achieve their goals.

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Dr. Robert Sege and Dr. Tracy Schatzberg talk about the number of victims a typical bully might have and how that impacts the reporting of the bullying. (1:04)

Sege explains how bullies likely didn't learn appropriate ways to channel their natural aggression when they were small children. (0:42)

Sege provides a couple of examples of the types of bullying cases he has seen in his practice as a pediatrician. (1:08)

Listen to some final thoughts from parents from Sege, Dr. Tracy Schatzberg, and David Tirella. (2:27)

Dr. Gary Namie explains that organizations need “bully training” just like they need diversity training, and he talks about a school district employing the training for its adult staff members. (1:13)

Namie distinguishes between a bully and a tough boss and describes what behavior crosses the line into bullying. (1:48)

February 20, 2009

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The USF Contemporary Art Museum is giving you the chance to see what goes on 'behind-the-scenes' with its "Museum at Work" Exhibit. This week's University Beat takes a closer look at the exhibition, which aims to document some of the five-thousand works in the Museum's collection.
For more information: 

The USF Contemporary Art Museum
813-974-2849

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Peter Foe, Curator of the Collection for the USF Contemporary Art Museum, takes us on a walk-through of what happens during the "Museum at Work" exhibition.

Peter Foe talks about what the public can learn from the exhibition.

Peter Foe says the USF Contemporary Art Museum has a great reputation worldwide.

David Norr, Chief Curator for the USF Institute for Research in Art, talks about the "Sixty Mintues" exhibition.

Program

Florida Innovators
This week, we take a journey through Florida’s relationship with innovation, from past well-known inventions all the way to cutting-edge research and developments going on today. Host Irene Maher introduces us to Peter Lefferson, an inventor who embodies the saying: “Necessity is the mother of invention”. We travel to Florida’s High-Tech Corridor to discover what makes Florida such a prime location to do research, and contributing reporter Larry Elliston heads to a well-known area hospital that soon may find a cure for cancer

On the radio

marshland
A bill waiting for the governor's signature would give water-permit approval authority to water management district directors instead of appointed boards. It's part of an unrelated bill allowing more Florida-friendly landscaping and was added at the last minute. This week on Florida Matters, we'll explore why some people say the change is a bad idea while others say it's not really a change at all.
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Listen to Hugh Gramling provide more details about the good provisions in SB 2080 that he says far outweigh the single controversial amendment that’s been the topic of our conversation. (1:55)

David Flagg says public participation in water issues sometimes is through less formal channels. He also notes that the agriculture industry, in particular, gets involved in water policy in the Suwannee River district. (1:28)

January 30, 2009

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USF is continuing its relationship with the prestigious UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education by sending a group of students to the Netherlands, while at the same time welcoming a group of the institute's students to the Bay area. This week's University Beat takes a closer look at this exchange program and how it will help address the world's water issues.
For more information: 

USF International Research Experience for Students Program

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Dr. Daniel Yeh, USF College of Engineering assistant professor and research fellow at the USF Patel Center for Global Solutions, says there's a number of advantages to USF's relationship with the UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education.

Dr. Yeh talks about some of the things the USF students have seen on their summer trip to the Netherlands.

Once he gets back from the Netherlands, USF Environmental Engineering Graduate Student Duncan Peabody is headed to the Dominican Republic to work with the Peace Corps for the next 2 years.

USF Global Health PhD Candidate Wendy Mussoline talks about the research she's doing at UNESCO on anaerobic digestion.

USF Senior Robert Bair talks about how his experiences have led him to major in both Environmental Science and International Studies, and then shares a rather hilarious Dutch language lesson.

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This week's University Beat features a conversation with Dr. Bernard LaFayette, Jr. The Tampa native, a leader of the Civil Rights Movement, is spreading the nonviolence message of his colleague and friend, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., through a new center at USF.
For more information: 

USF's Jim Walter Partnership Center
813-974-5709

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Dr. Bernard LaFayette Junior says the stand-off at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, in 1973 was a great example of how a breakdown in communication can be overcome through peaceful means.

Dr. LaFayette talks about some of the foreign countries where nonviolence centers are developing, and some of the surprising participants in the program.

Dr. LaFayette thinks that President Barack Obama has benefitted by accepting a lot of Dr. Martin Luther King's teachings.

Dr. LaFayette talks about how important it is to learn from our mistakes, as well as about how he'd like to be remembered.

Manuel Rivero, Executive Director of the USF Jim Walter Partnership Center, talks about how the Center fits into the legacy of builder Jim Walter.

Program

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Irene, Carson and Larry
Paying tribute to the Bay Area community for making Florida Matters possible: This week Larry and Carson join Irene in the studio to celebrate the first season of Florida Matters on TV. They take a look at their favorite segments throughout the first season and share with viewers some of the behind-the-scenes events that happened after the show aired. Our “Thank You” gift for members who support WUSF with $75 or more will receive a commemorative Florida Matters DVD featuring the first season of Florida Stories. It’s a great keepsake to have and a testimony to the impact your contribution can make to the community!

On the radio

Shiekra at Busch Gardens
The economic recession is keeping many would-be travelers at home. Across Florida, that's leading to amped-up marketing in hopes of drawing people here. This week, we take an informal survey of the tourism industry to find out what those businesses are expecting for the summer and where they are directing their efforts.
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Listen to Chris Pike explain that Florida will be well-positioned for future increases in travel to the United States from South America -- and maybe to Cuba. (0:22)

Listen to Pike talk about the impact on travel agencies from the trend toward booking travel online. (0:36)

Listen to Jennifer De La Cruz explain why Carnival is offering great bargains right now and how new passport rules are impacting the cruise industry. (1:12)

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The University of South Florida is trying to help students who are among the first generation of their families to attend college pay for school. This week's University Beat takes you to a recent fund-raiser for the First Generation Scholarship Program and introduces you to some of the recipients.
For more information: 

Ruth Bannhard, Senior Director of Development, USF Foundation
E-mail: rbannhard@admin.usf.edu or 813-974-1983

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USF Junior Juan Baso talks about how much the First Generation Scholarship Program has helped him.

Joel Momberg, the Vice President of University Advancement and CEO of the USF Foundation, says the students who receive the Scholarships are truly deserving.

Program

Larry Elliston on the waterfront
This week Larry Elliston shares the stories of Floridians who have helped others move to Florida from overseas and "Dr. Bob" who volunteers his time to offer better healthcare. Plus, we'll meet a man who used his experience in prison to turn his life around and help others after he was released.

On the radio

Hurricane off the coast of Florida
As another hurricane season begins, officials don't want residents to be complacent after a few quiet seasons. It only takes one storm to ruin your summer. This week, we'll meet Florida's new emergency manager, debunk some hurricane preparation myths, and check on Galveston, Texas, where they weathered last year's biggest storm.
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Listen to Ruben Almaguer explain that hurricane season predictions have one value: they get covered by the media and so they get people thinking about hurricane preparedness. (1:03)

Listen to Almaguer talk about some of his agency’s responsibilities beyond hurricane preparedness and response. (1:07)

Listen to John Simsen describe how Galveston officials elevated the entire city 17 feet after the 1900 hurricane. (1:03)

Listen to Simsen explain how officials in Texas have set up resources along evacuation routes to avoid the kinds of problems faced by evacuees prior to Hurricane Rita in 2005. (1:21)

Listen to Dr. Chris Landsea echo the sentiments of all of our guests that hurricane forecasts are basically useless at the local level. He notes that it just takes one hurricane making landfall in your community to make it a busy season and points to Hurricanes Andrew and Katrina as examples. (1:20)

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This week’s University Beat takes us back to the USF spinoff company, “Rehab Ideas,” as a disabled Mississippi man becomes the first owner of an off-road wheelchair designed by USF engineering students.
For more information: 

Rehab Ideas
E-mail: sales@rehabideas.com or 813-600-3058

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Dana Roeling, the Chief Operating Officer of Rehab Ideas, says the products her company brings to market are created by students in the USF Capstone Design Course for Mechanical Engineering taught by Stephen Sundarrao.

A closer look at Michael Foradori, the first buyer of the “Mobili T Rover.”

Program

Larry Elliston at the park
What does a paintbrush, a park and a bicycle all have in common? Find out this week on Florida Matters as co-host Larry Elliston brings us a collection of Florida Stories that will inspire you to look at things in a new way.

On the radio

Florida House Chamber
Lawmakers used federal stimulus money and a variety of increased fees to support a $66.5 billion spending plan for next year. But they failed to pass any significant tax reforms. This week, we look back at the annual legislative session and talk about what was done and what was left unfinished.
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Listen to Rep. Ambler and Sen. Justice talk about the primary contest between Gov. Charlie Crist and former House Speaker Marco Rubio. Both men hope to be the Republican candidate in the race to replace Mel Martinez in the U.S. Senate. (2:11)

Listen to Justice and Ambler discuss the failed proposal to ease restrictions on K-12 class size because of the tight budget. (3:54)

Listen to Ambler describe two ways he thinks lawmakers could reform the tax system, including re-evaluating the state’s pension system. (5:03)

Listen to Ambler describe a conversation he had at the beginning of the session with the Senate finance chair in an attempt to work on better collection of tax revenues owed to the state. (1:50)

Listen to Tom Lee explain why he thinks recovering from this down economy will take years and how consumers' behavior has changed because of the recession. (1:41)

Legislative Session Analysis – WebExtra6.wma
Listen to Lee compare Gov. Charlie Crist's leadership style with that of former Gov. Jeb Bush. (1:01)

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It's not "practice makes perfect," it's "perfect practice makes perfect." This week's University Beat looks at how USF Health is using the latest technology at its new Simulation Center at Tampa General Hospital to improve the training and skills of physicians, nurses and other practitioners.
For more information: 

Stephanie McKown, RN, BSN, Clinical Education Specialist, USF Health Simulation Center at Tampa General Hospital
E-mail: Stephanie.McKown@medsimulation.com or 813-844-3436

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Dr. Alexander Rosemurgy, USF professor of surgery & medicine and Associate Dean of Medical Simulation & Academic Enrichment, says the simulators aren't so much about 'surprising' practitioners with the unbelievable.

Dr. Rosemurgy talks about the 'human element' simulators like SimMan (www.laerdal.com) bring to medical training.

Dr. Rosemurgy says simulators fit into the evolution of medical training.

Dr. Stuart Hart, a USF Assistant professor of Obstetrics/Gynecology, takes us through a virtual procedure on the Lap Mentor II (www.simbionix.com).

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police officer
This week we're taking a serious look at the state of crime in our area. We'll ask local law enforcement to weigh in on the trends they're seeing, and discuss ways we can all avoid becoming victims. And we'll take a look at the relationship between education and crime. Then Larry Elliston introduces us to a former convict who turned his life around and hopes to inspire others to do the same.

On the radio

finger print kit
An often-cited statistic among law enforcement professionals goes something like this: 6 percent of people commit 60 percent of the crime. We'll learn about efforts by one local sheriff's office to catch that 60 percent. Plus, white-collar and financial crimes have been all over the news. We'll look at how investigators are going after the culprits, this week.
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Listen to Victor Lessoff and Norm Meadows explain that their agents are trained in accounting and that they get requests from other federal law enforcement agencies who need financial expertise in the course of their own investigations. (1:51)

Listen to Lessoff and Meadows talk about the costs of tax fraud and financial schemes to citizens. (1:08)

Program

University Beat continues looking at some of the things the University of South Florida is doing to get its students ready for the challenging job market. This week, the focus turns to the USF Career Center and its programs, specifically "Careers a la Cart," where employers hit the campus' roads to meet possible new hires.
For more information: 

USF Career Center
813-974-2171

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Cynthia Newhouse, USF Career Center's Student & Employer Relations Coordinator, says a change to the dress code for job fairs at the University is paying off for everyone involved.

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food from different cultures
Join us as we explore the international diversity of the Bay Area. Florida is a melting pot, an international community that represents countries from around the globe. So what do foreigners bring to the table? We'll answer that question, literally, as we take a look at the types of food you can find in Florida thanks to our diverse international culture. We head to Pinellas county and meet some young immigrants in the public school system who are integrating into the American way of life. And Larry Elliston introduces us to a family who are happy to now call America home.

On the radio

diversity
If you have not sat through one, you have heard about them: diversity training. Corporations, nonprofits and educational institutions all offer the classes. But do the sessions foster greater understanding among people of different cultural backgrounds? This week, learn about why organizations offer this training and how well it works.
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Listen to Teddy Pierre’s quick rundown of how he does diversity training. (1:23)

Listen to Piero Falci explain the four steps he goes through in the training he provides. (1:06)

Listen to Pierre explain why he doesn't use videos in his training workshops and instead focuses on experiential learning. (0:44)

Listen to more from Luke Visconti during the portion of our conversation where gay marriage was used as an example of an issue that could cause hostility or harassment in the workplace. (2:28)

Listen to Visconti explain why it's natural for individuals to group together into ethnically based business groups or student unions on college campuses. (2:23)

Program

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For the next two weeks, University Beat is looking at some of the things the University of South Florida is doing to get its students ready for the challenging job market. This week, we take you to a College of Business competition where students try to impress a possible employer during a one-minute elevator ride.
For more information: 

USF College of Business
813-974-4281

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USF Senior Carmen Perez demonstrates her winning interview technique.

Carmen Perez and Junior Kristen Shalosky talk about the strategies they used during the Elevator Competition.

Senior Woodley Saint-Juste and Kristen Shalosky talk about how the Competition helps them prepare for future situations in their job searches.

Program

Clara Ann Yarian getting water
We play in it, clean with it, cook with it, admire it, and depend on it for survival. We're talking about water and the delicate relationship our state has with this natural resource. This week we examine the current water crisis. Joshua Stewart Visits the Tampa Bay Seawater Desalination Plant. Host Irene Maher interviews the author of "Mirage, Florida and the Vanishing Water of the Eastern U.S." We find out more about the upcoming Drought Summit in Tampa, and hear from area farmers about alternative ways to grow crops. Irene meets with a local gardening expert to learn tips for dealing with new water restrictions. Larry Elliston introduces us to a group of people who take water conservation to the next level.

On the radio

drop of water from a hose
After three years of below-average rainfall, the rivers are low and the reservoir is empty. Water managers and local governments have imposed the tightest water-use restrictions ever. But out West, communities have been dealing with drought for decades. What can we learn from them? We'll talk about some of the best ways those areas are planning for - and withstanding - drought conditions.
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Irene Maher sits down with Robyn Felix, from the Southwest Water Management District, to talk about the upcoming Regional Water Shortage Management Workshop, also known as the "Drought Summit." The workshop is being held at the Tampa Convention Center on May 5.

Florida Matters asks area residents how they're coping with the water restrictions.

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Listen to Dave Moore describe the current water-use restrictions imposed by Swiftmud and why the district decided not to impose them in February when they were first considered. (2:20)

Listen to Amy Klabunde describe the types of restrictions that are put in place when the reservoirs in Aurora's water system get low. (0:42)

Listen to Moore explain how Florida farmers are encouraged to manage their water use through "drought credits." (1:08)

Listen to Marsha Prillwitz talk about surveys that show Californians are willing to conserve water when asked to do so. (1:39)

The idea behind our discussion this week was to find out what we can learn about water and drought planning from other communities. But listen to Prillwitz note how impressed she is with how the Bay area is weathering the drought. (1:57)

Listen to Jerry Seeber explain how Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas counties have been weaned from only using groundwater sources. (1:32)

Listen to Seeber detail why using reclaimed water in drinking supplies is so expensive. (1:09)

Listen to Seeber urge residents to continue their water-conservation efforts. He also says the Tampa Bay water system is more diversified than other places in the country. (2:04)

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This week's University Beat examines how USF is recognizing and promoting diversity and tolerance with a look at the recent USF Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community GALA Event.
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Dr. Karen Berkman, Chair of USF's Committee on Issues of Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity, talks about where USF's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community is currently and where it's heading.

Merrell Dickey, the USF Alumni Association's Director of Chapters & Corporate Relations, says recognizing the contributions of USF's LGBT community benefits the University.

USF Polytechnic Counseling Specialist Susan Hurley says the LGBT community on the Tampa campus has moved their counterparts at the other USF campuses to act.

Former USF President Betty Castor talks about how the University has changed over time when it comes to diversity issues.

Program

glass blower
Whether you're an art connoisseur or paint-by-numbers is more your style, we're going to take you off the beaten path this week to introduce you to some bay area artists you may not know. We ask the question: What defines art? We'll show you a couple examples right here in the bay area that defy conventional standards of the definition. Host Irene Maher takes us to a small community in Pinellas County that is fired up about the arts. Carson Cooper introduces us to a photographer who considers conservation awareness just as important as the framing of his shot when considering his next project, while Susan Giles Wantuck travels to an artist's retreat right in Manatee county that provides the perfect backdrop for artistic creativity. And Larry Elliston introduces us to a painter who finds inspiration right in his own backyard.

On the radio

artist sketching
For many artists, their creations are a hobby, a passion, an outlet. Some artists make a go of it as professionals, depending on their creativity to provide an income. But is there demand for art in this sour economy? And how do you take that leap to turn art-making into a career? This week, learn how artists are making that happen.
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Listen to the group talk about mass reproductions of art and how that can be a revenue source for artists. (6:07)

Listen to Sharon Rose and Suzanne Williamson explain how the amount of money artists make can vary widely. (1:43)

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This week's University Beat focuses in on the Campus MovieFest, where USF students are given a week to produce a five-minute film - and their creativity has to be seen to be believed!
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Brandon Chong, Campus MovieFest Director of Education Program, praises the creativity of the students who take part in the event.

University Beat re-introduces you to USF Junior Sarah Wilson (University Beat 08/18/08 Student Filmmakers), who won this year's USF Best Picture Award for her film, "Rhapsody."

March 16, 2009

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man in a garden
Going green is red hot these days, but you might not be aware of all the different ways you can be friendlier to the environment while improving your own life. Host Irene Maher introduces us to Jim Kovaleski, of New Port Richey, who combines form and function by turning his entire yard into a garden of "eat'n." Meanwhile, Carson Cooper takes us to Sweetwater Organic Community Farm, a little bit of country right in the heart of the city. Later, Kim Button, from Greenwell Consulting, shows us how to rid your body and home of unnecessary chemicals. Switching gears over to the alternative energy side, you'll also meet a man who's "green" approach to gas-guzzling vehicles caused a seafood company out of Orlando to completely restructure their business. Larry Elliston then introduces us to a teacher in St. Petersburg who turned an energy-saving house project into a valuable learning lesson for her class.

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solar panel
Florida officials want more renewable energy. A bill in the Legislature would mandate that power companies get 20 percent of their energy from renewable sources like wind, solar, bio-mass and nuclear power. But it's still uncertain if the measure will pass, and if it does, what the resulting system will look like. Learn about the proposal as well as developments in Florida's solar industry.
For more information: 

Ten Most Important Fruits and Vegetables to Buy Organic:
1. Peaches
2. Apples
3. Sweet Bell Peppers
4. Celery
5. Nectarines
6. Strawberries
7. Cherries
8. Lettuce
9. Grapes-Imported
10. Pears

Based on Pesticide Levels Studies by the Environmental Working Group

Definitions:

Going Green: A phrase referring to individual action that a person can consciously take to curb harmful effects on the environment through consumer habits, behavior, and lifestyle.

Sustainable: Actions and products that meet current needs without sacrificing the ability of future generations to meet theirs. Sustainability is a broad term and often refers to the desire to provide the best outcomes for the human and natural environments both now and into the indefinite future.

Carbon Footprint: The total amount of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases emitted over the full lifecycle of a product or service, expressed as grams of CO2 equivalents. Greenhouse gases contribute to global warming and climate change, so reducing carbon footprints is desirable for a healthier earth.

Co-op: Short for co-operative. Worker cooperatives are owned and democratically controlled by its workers. Since the co-op is worker-owned and membership is not compulsory, this type of manufacturing set-up avoids exploitation of its workers.

Green Building: A green building is designed to conserve resources and reduce negative impacts on the environment - whether it is energy, water, building materials or land. Compared to conventional construction, green buildings may use one or more renewable energy systems for heating and cooling, such as solar electric, solar hot water, geothermal, bio mass, or any combinaion of these.

Source - http://lohas.com/glossary.html

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Irene speaks to Kim Button, an Eco-Wellness consultant, from Greenwell Consulting in Orlando, Florida.

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Listen to Jim King reiterate that it's still unclear what the rates charged for renewable energy might be and note that wind energy and hydropower from the ocean are still being looked at as possible energy sources. (2:12)

Listen to Zac Anderson explain how a feed-in tariff system might help bring the cost of solar panels down. (0:44)

February 13, 2009

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As WUSF-TV prepares this week to switch its analog transmitter off and broadcast completely in digital, University Beat looks back at the station's 43-year history with a man who was there at the very beginning.
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A more in-depth look at the history and future of WUSF TV/DT.

William Brady, talks about the relationship between WUSF and the University of South Florida, and how it has evolved over the years.

William Brady, the first Radio Coordinator for WUSF and later program manager for WUSF-TV and WUSF 89.7 FM, talks about how he ended up working in both operations.

Program

Asolo Theater
This week we explore the beautiful ways Floridians are preserving the historic structures in our area. We'll go inside an 18th century Italian theatre, that has called Sarasota "home" for over 50 years. And we'll head to Polk county for a trip down memory lane, where Elvis Presley and Judy Garland were known to stop by. Then Larry Elliston takes us back to St. Petersburg's "yesteryear" to show us how what's old is new again.

On the radio

Ringling Hotel
Occasionally, we hear about a building under dispute because it has historic value to some people but another group of people wants to tear it down. The Belleview Biltmore and Sarasota's Riverview High School are two recent examples - one was saved, the other will soon be gone. But the question remains: why does historic preservation matter?
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Listen to an expanded version of our conversation with Lisa Shasteen about the Floridan Hotel in downtown Tampa. (12:04)

Lisa Shasteen encourages anyone with memories or photographs of the Floridan in its heyday to share them with the owners. (0:28)

Listen to Linda Saul-Sena describe the city's role in historic preservation in Tampa as well as the new "demolition by neglect" ordinance the city council recently enacted. (1:24)

Listen to Trent Green explain why it's difficult to adapt Tampa's historic cigar factories to new uses. (1:12)

Listen to Linda Saul-Sena explain why the I-4 widening project by the Department of Transportation demonstrated good government action to save historic structures. (0:49)

Listen to Lorrie Muldowney outline how local laws in Sarasota make allowances for classifying newer buildings as historic structures as well as the impact a historic designation can have on an owner's responsibilities for hurricane-proofing the building. (1:10)

Listen to Lorrie Muldowney explain the role of the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation. (1:25)

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This week's University Beat hits the links as USF's College of Education prepares for the 10th Annual SUNRIPE Golf Classic, which has raised more than one million dollars for the college's "SUNRIPE Migrant Scholarship Fund." The scholarships help the children of migrants come to USF to become teachers who then go back to help their communities.
For more information: 

SUNRIPE Golf Tournament
941-722-3291

USF's Center for Migrant Education
813-974-1387

Video extras
Video extras descriptions: 

Dr. Ann Cranston-Gingras, USF Professor of Special Education and Director of the Center for Migrant Education, talks about the success of the Migrant Scholars program.

Dr. Colleen Kennedy, the Dean of USF's College of Education, says the support of corporations like the SUNRIPE family of companies is vital to programs like this one.

Program

women exercising
Meet Dr. Eric Coris, a physician with USF Family Sports and Medicine, who shares a list of 47 health conditions that he says can be reduced, if not eliminated, by a modest amount of exercise. Viewers may be surprised to see even mental health conditions on the list. Carson Cooper demonstrates alternative forms of exercise that might tickle your funny bone as well as teach you how to strengthen your bones. Irene invites us into her kitchen for tips on better nutrition and how to make a heart-healthy meal. As the saying goes: It's not just what you do, it's also what you EAT. Then back to the studio for a demonstration from dietician Christine Miller on healthy choices for people who eat "on-the-go." And Larry Elliston introduces us to Dr. Bob, an 85-year-old retired physican who volunteers at a local health clinic and puts his own advice for exercise to practice.

On the radio

hospital hallway with gurneys
Once you're admitted to the hospital, you're already sick. But while some patients are trying to heal, they get an infection and get worse instead. The Centers for Disease Control reports that 1.7 million people develop these healthcare-associated infections; about 99,000 people die from them. Learn how Florida hospitals are fighting to stop people from getting sicker once they are admitted.
Video extras
Video extras descriptions: 

Host Irene Maher shares her recipe for healthy Creamy Chicken Potatoes.

Host Irene Maher shares a healthy recipe for Healthy Bran Muffins.

Audio extras
Audio extra descriptions: 

Listen to Martha DeCastro explain the sterilization procedures used by hospitals before surgeries. (1:17)

Listen to DeCastro and Jay Wolfson judge whether U.S. hospitals are among the safest in the world. (1:24)

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This week's University Beat takes you to the 36th annual Engineering Expo, where students from USF's College of Engineering attempt to reach the next generation of would-be scientists and techies.
Video extras
Video extras descriptions: 

USF Senior Eric "Dr. Bull" Norton talks about the "Fun with Physics" demonstration his group, the Society of Physics Students put on during the Engineering Expo.

USF Computer Science & Engineering Instructor/Expo Faculty Adviser, Dr. Henrick Jeanty, says USF students get a lot out of their involvement with the Expo.

USF Engineering Expo Coordinating Directors, Chemical Engineering Junior Ana Rioja and Industrial Engineering Senior Janna Ward, talk about how attending the Expo when they were younger (Anna was in middle school, Janna high school) made a difference in their college plans.

USF Chemical & Bioengineering Graduate Student Justin Stewart, the Expo's Director for Students & Youth Groups, says the great thing about engineering is there are no borders to it.

Program

cars on the highway
The Tampa Bay area poses a unique challenge for mass transportation. We'll take a look at the reasons we're behind other metropolitan areas our size and what community leaders are doing to increase our transportation options. You'll also see why having better transportation options makes for a better economy. And we'll hear from one man who has turned his commute to work into a way of life for his whole family.

On the radio

light rail
For years, Floridians have heard that the solution to our traffic woes is rail: commuter rail, high-speed rail, light rail. In the Bay area, creation of a regional transit master plan is underway and Tampa's mayor is pushing for light rail in the city. We'll talk to people from Miami and Salt Lake City to find out how they created their rail systems and what they've learned from operating them.
Audio extras
Audio extra descriptions: 

Listen to Albert Hernandez explain why the voter-approved surtax in Miami-Dade County has been used for maintenance and operations rather than expansion of the county's heavy rail system. (1:39)

Listen to Carrie Bohnsack-Ware explain why fuel costs were the biggest challenge for Salt Lake City's rail system in the last year. (1:37)

Listen to our guests talk about which cities they looked to for examples of successful rail transit when they were planning their own systems. (2:19)

Listen to Steve Reich explore the cultural differences throughout the country that might make rail more popular in some areas than in others. (1:36)

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This week's University Beat pays a visit to "X-Labs," a USF student-run group that builds interest in math and science through practical, hands-on experiments, like a weather balloon that soars almost 20 miles above the earth.
Video extras
Video extras descriptions: 

X-Labs co-creator/USF graduate Joseph Register and current X-Labs president/USF senior Nicholas Melton talk more about the student-run organization.

X-Labs faculty advisor, USF professor of electrical engineering, Dr. Ralph Fehr, talks about X-Labs.

University Beat introduces you to the youngest member of X-Labs, 14 year old high school freshman Coyt Barringer.

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