Morning Edition

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with four hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse.Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.
Schedule:

Monday - Friday 5:00 AM to 9:00 AM on WUSF 89.7

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Host:
Carson Cooper

Carson Cooper is a familiar voice. He has become a favorite of WUSF listeners as the local host of NPR's "Morning Edition" on WUSF 89.7 since he took the job in 2000. Carson has worked in Tampa Bay radio for more than two decades. He has been the host of WUSF 89.7's Florida Matters since its launch in 2006. During that time he has reported on a variety of issues of importance to the community, including growth management, education, transportation, affordable housing, taxation, public health and the environment.

Host:
David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became... Read More...

Host:
Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts the program with Renée Montagne and David Greene.

Traveling from Baghdad to the wreckage of New Orleans, Inskeep has interviewed the survivors of disasters both natural and man-made. He has questioned Presidential candidates, warlords, authors, and musicians. He also interviews people who otherwise would be overlooked: a steelworker, a school board member, the mother of a soldier killed in war.

Inskeep's first full-time assignment for NPR was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the U.S. Senate, and the 2000... Read More...

Host:
Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with David Greene and Steve Inskeep.

Previously, she was the host of NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday. Prior to moving into the host position in the fall of 2012, Martin started as National Security Correspondent for NPR in May 2010. In that position she covered both defense and intelligence issues. She traveled regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Secretary of Defense, reporting on the U.S. wars and the effectiveness of the Pentagon's counterinsurgency strategy. Martin also reported extensively on the changing demographic of the U.S. military – from the debate over whether to allow women to fight in combat units... Read More...

From Morning Edition

  • Germans Head To The Polls On Sunday, Merkel Expected To Win Another Term
    <p>The federal election this weekend will ultimately decided if Angela Merkel wins a fourth term as chancellor. Merkel is expected to win, but the rise of a right-wing party could complicate her future.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552822176' />
  • The Rise Of The Far-Right In German Politics
    <p>German voters go to the polls this weekend in national elections, and although Chancellor Angela Merkel is expected to win handily, the right-wing AfD party has been on the rise.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552803458' />
  • Enough With The Pumpkin Spice Already
    <p>Because not all foods are pumpkin spice flavored yet, the company Simply Beyond has made a spray-on pumpkin spice flavoring. Because there's clearly not enough pumpkin spice in the world. </p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552803451' />
  • What It Means To Be German
    <p>Germany took in over a million refugees in 2015. Ahead of this weekend's election, we explore the process of becoming a German citizen.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552803430' />
  • The Limits Of Free Speech In Germany
    <p>Shahak Shapira, an Israeli artist based in Berlin, talks about what it's like to push the boundaries of free speech in Germany.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552803416' />
  • Detroit Red Wings Selling Vials Of 'Melted Ice' (Also Known As Water)
    <p>The Detroit Red Wings are selling commemorative vials of "melted ice" — also known as water — from their former hockey rink. They cost $85 and benefit the team's foundation. There are only 3,000. </p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552803409' />
  • News Brief: German Election, Trump Vs. GOP In Alabama, Search And Rescue In Mexico
    <p>Even if German Chancellor Merkel is re-elected Sunday, there's no guarantee it will be business as usual. Also, a Senate campaign in Alabama is exposing division between Trump and other Republicans.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552803388' />
  • Arkansas Defies Monsanto, Moves To Ban Rogue Weedkiller
    <img src='https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2017/09/22/img_58951_wide-37919d0e4a95e4cfd28dbd8958ce8f09208f475f.jpg?s=600' alt='David Wildy, a prominent Arkansas farmer, in a field of soybeans that were damaged by dicamba. He says that "farmers need this technology. But right is right and wrong is wrong. And when you let a technology, a pesticide or whatever, get on your neighbor, it's not right. We can't do that."'/><p>Arkansas regulators are on a collision course with Monsanto, voting to ban use during the growing season of a drift-prone herbicide that Monsanto says is farmers' best hope for weed-free fields.</p><p>(Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552803465' />
  • Arkansas Poised To Ban Most Use Of Monsanto Herbicide
    <p>Regulators in Arkansas have voted to ban summertime use of a weedkiller that's blamed for damaging millions of acres of crops and wild vegetation. Monsanto is fighting the measure.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552803465' />
  • Heritage Foundation On Graham-Cassidy Health Care Bill
    <p>The clock is ticking on the Republican effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. David Greene talks to Tommy Binion of the conservative Heritage Foundation about the Graham-Cassidy bill.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=552803444' />

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