Weekend Edition Saturday

Saturday mornings are made for Weekend Edition Saturday, the program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories. The two-hour program is hosted by NPR's Peabody Award-winning Scott Simon. Drawing on his experience in covering 10 wars and stories in all 50 states and seven continents, Simon brings a humorous, sophisticated and often moving perspective to each show. He is as comfortable having a conversation with a major world leader as he is talking with a Hollywood celebrity or the guy next door. Weekend Edition Saturday has a unique and entertaining roster of other regular contributors. Marin Alsop, conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, talks about music. Daniel Pinkwater, one of the biggest names in children's literature, talks about and reads stories with Simon. Financial journalist Joe Nocera follows the economy. Howard Bryant of EPSN.com and NPR's Tom Goldman chime in on sports. Keith Devlin, of Stanford University, unravels the mystery of math, and Will Grozier, a London cabbie, talks about good books that have just been released, and what well-read people leave in the back of his taxi. Simon contributes his own award-winning essays, which are sometimes humorous, sometimes poignant. Weekend Edition Saturday is heard on WUSF and other NPR Member stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR Worldwide. The conversation between the audience and the program staff continues throughout the social media world.

Saturday 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM on WUSF 89.7

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Scott Simon

Scott Simon is one of America's most admired writers and broadcasters. He has reported from all fifty states, five continents, and ten wars, from El Salvador to Sarajevo to Afghanistan and Iraq. His books have chronicled character and characters, in war and peace, sports and art, tragedy and comedy.

Simon's weekly show, Weekend Edition Saturday, has been called by the Washington Post, "the most literate, witty, moving, and just plain interesting news show on any dial," and by Brett Martin of Time-Out New York "the most eclectic, intelligent two hours of broadcasting on the airwaves." He has won every major award in broadcasting, including the Peabody, the Emmy,... Read More...

From Weekend Edition (Saturday)

  • Actress Cynthia Nixon Challenges N.Y. Gov. Cuomo; GOP See Opportunity
    <p>Actress Cynthia Nixon announced her run for New York governor against incumbent Andrew Cuomo. NPR's Scott Simon talks to Brigid Bergin, politics reporter at WNYC, about the September primaries.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596647532' />
  • The Week In Sports: NCAA Basketball, Minor League Baseball
    <p>The NCAA men's tournament is down to eight teams, and baseball makes an unexpected entry in the omnibus spending bill.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596647525' />
  • Sisi Is All But Assured A Second Term In Egypt's Presidential Election
    <p>Egypt has a presidential election starting Monday, but the winner is almost certain already: Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. And tight restrictions limit discussion of other options.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596647518' />
  • Trump Swaps Complete Ban For 'Qualified Ban' On Transgender Military Service
    <p>President Trump has announced new rules banning certain transgender people from serving in the military. The new policy replaces the administration's earlier ban on transgender troops.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596656712' />
  • In Good Facebook News, This Woman Got Her Wallet Back After 50 Years
    <p>A woman got a message from a stranger who found her wallet — almost 50 years after it was stolen. A construction worker renovating the store where the wallet went missing got in touch via Messenger.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596647511' />
  • 'Cow Clicker' Developer: Facebook's Response To Complaints Is Too Late
    <p>NPR's Scott Simon talks with Ian Bogost about data collected from Facebook-connected apps. In 2010, Bogost launched Cow Clicker, a parody game that inadvertently collected a lot of user information.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596647504' />
  • Crowds Arrive For 'March For Our Lives' In D.C.
    <p>They're coming by car, by plane and by bus: Throngs of protesters arrive in Washington for Saturday's "March for Our Lives" rally to end gun violence.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596647497' />
  • What's 'Dangerous' About Trump's New National Security Adviser?
    <p>Scott Simon asks Matt Purple, managing editor of "The American Conservative," why he calls new national security adviser John Bolton one of the "most dangerous national security operatives" in D.C.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596647490' />
  • French Police Officer Who Traded Himself For A Hostage Has Died
    <p>A gunman took hostages in a supermarket in Southern France yesterday, killing at least two people. In an effort to switch places with a hostage during the standoff, a police officer died a hero.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596656705' />
  • New York's Adirondack Park Is 'Bigger And More Protected Than Ever'
    <p>New York's Adirondack Park has some of the biggest wilderness in the eastern U.S. — and it just got bigger. This week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo protected another 25,000 acres.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=596647483' />


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