Weekend Edition Sunday

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The program has covered news events from Nelson Mandela's 1990 release from a South African prison to the capture of Saddam Hussein. Weekend Edition Sunday debuted on January 18, 1987, with host Susan Stamberg. Two years later, Liane Hansen took over the host chair, a position she held for 22 years. In that time, Hansen interviewed movers and shakers in politics, science, business and the arts. Her reporting travels took her from the slums of Cairo to the iron mines of Michigan's Upper Peninsula; from the oyster beds on the bayou in Houma, La., to Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park; and from the kitchens of Colonial Williamsburg, Va., to the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. In January 2012, Rachel Martin began hosting the program. Previously she served as NPR National Security Correspondent and was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project. She has also been the NPR religion correspondent and foreign correspondent based in Berlin. Every week listeners tune in to hear a unique blend of news, features and the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times. Weekend Edition Sunday is heard on WUSF and other NPR Member stations across the United States and around the globe via NPR Worldwide. The conversation between the audience and the program staff continues throughout the social media world.

Sunday 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM on WUSF 89.7

Contact Info:

Contact the Show

Lulu Garcia-Navarro
Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday. Previously, she served as an NPR international correspondent covering South America and was based out of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

She's also served as an NPR correspondent based in Israel, reporting on stories happening throughout the Middle East. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011... Read More...

From Weekend Edition (Sunday)

  • The Reality Of School Shooting Drills
    <p>Florida schools have ramped up "code red drills" in the aftermath of the Parkland shooting. One teacher plans to post footage of the drills online to build support for more restrictive gun laws.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671331' />
  • Pennsylvania Voters React To Lamb's Apparent Win
    <p>Democrat Conor Lamb appears to have won in a special election in Pennsylvania. NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro checks back in with Dave Podurgiel and Jojo Burgess, two voters in the district.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671324' />
  • Reconnecting With Childhood Friends
    <p>As part of our Missed Connections series, NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro reunites Sharony Green and Beth Hegab, former childhood friends who drifted apart, according to Green, in part because of race.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671317' />
  • Salvadoran Evangelicals Work To Change Lives Of Gang Members
    <p>El Salvador has one of the highest murder rates in the world, driven by gangs. <em>The Economist</em>'s Sarah Esther Maslin reported on how evangelical churches help gang members pull away from lives of crime.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671310' />
  • Tension Increases Between Moscow And London
    <p>NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to British MP Tom Tugendhat about the rising tensions between the U.K. and Russia, including the latest news that Russia is expelling 23 British diplomats.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671303' />
  • Report: Cambridge Analytica 'Harvested Private Information'
    <p>NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Matthew Rosenberg of <em>The New York Times</em> about Cambridge Analytica, which allegedly harvested information from millions of Facebook users without their permission.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671296' />
  • Spot Fake News By Making It
    <p>NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Sander van der Linden of the Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab about his online game which tries to teach players about fake news by making them produce it.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671289' />
  • Determine Potential Partners By Voice In New Dating App
    <p>A new dating app called Waving lets users judge potential partners by their voice. We talk with Robert Burriss of Basel University about the role a person's voice plays in attraction.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671282' />
  • The Call-In: Childhood Obesity
    <p>On this week's Call-In, we hear from listeners about childhood obesity. The epidemic continues to worsen in the U.S. Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Dr. David Ludwig of Boston Children's Hospital.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671275' />
  • The Money Behind The Midterms
    <p>NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with Carrie Levine, a reporter for The Center for Public Integrity, about where big political donors are putting their money during this year's midterm elections.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=594671268' />


FirstChoice eNewsletter